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Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 2018 Mar 27;62(4). pii: e02213-17. doi: 10.1128/AAC.02213-17. Print 2018 Apr.

Successful Treatment of Persistent Burkholderia cepacia Complex Bacteremia with Ceftazidime-Avibactam.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA ptamma1@jhmi.edu David.Greenberg@UTSouthwestern.edu.
2
Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA.
3
Department of Pathology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA.
4
Department of Pediatrics, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA.
5
Department of Pharmacy, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland, USA.
6
Division of Infectious Diseases, University of Texas Southwestern, Dallas, Texas, USA.
7
Division of Infectious Diseases, University of Texas Southwestern, Dallas, Texas, USA ptamma1@jhmi.edu David.Greenberg@UTSouthwestern.edu.
8
Department of Microbiology, University of Texas Southwestern, Dallas, Texas, USA.

Abstract

We report our clinical experience treating a 2-month-old infant with congenital diaphragmatic hernia who experienced prolonged bacteremia with Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) despite conventional antibiotic therapy and appropriate source control measures. The infection resolved after initiation of ceftazidime-avibactam. Whole-genome sequencing revealed that the isolate most closely resembled B. contaminans and identified the mechanism of resistance that likely contributed to clinical cure with this agent. Ceftazidime-avibactam should be considered salvage therapy for Bcc infections if other treatment options have been exhausted.

KEYWORDS:

Burkholderia cepacia complex; bacteremia; ceftazidime-avibactam; whole-genome sequencing

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