Format

Send to

Choose Destination
BMC Cancer. 2018 Mar 27;18(1):337. doi: 10.1186/s12885-018-4245-5.

To fast, or not to fast before chemotherapy, that is the question.

Author information

1
Clinical Nutrition and Dietetics Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo, Viale Golgi 19, 27100, Pavia, Italy. r.caccialanza@smatteo.pv.it.
2
Clinical Nutrition and Dietetics Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo, Viale Golgi 19, 27100, Pavia, Italy.
3
Italian Federation of Volunteer-based Cancer Organizations, Rome, Italy.
4
Department of Oncology, ASST Fatebenefratelli Sacco, Milan, Italy.
5
Medical Oncology Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo, Pavia, Italy.

Abstract

Fasting in disease prevention and treatment has recently become a popular topic, particularly in the context of oncology. Unfortunately, the growing attention paid by the media has created a background of speculations and ambiguous messages. The attitude towards the role of fasting in cancer patients should be very cautious, as the risk of malnutrition/sarcopenia and disinformation may be associated with this approach. Whether the results obtained by fasting in the cellular and animal models can be transferred to cancer patients is still to be ascertained. At the moment, more preclinical studies are required to determine in which cancers, at which stage, and in what combinations fasting, fasting-mimicking diets or caloric restriction mimetics may prove effective. So, despite the "rumors" of marketing and media, nowadays fasting and calorie restriction around CT represent only a promising intuition, which requires proper efforts and time to be validated by evidence-based clinical data.

KEYWORDS:

Calorie restriction; Chemotherapy; Fasting; Malnutrition; Sarcopenia

PMID:
29587670
PMCID:
PMC5870384
DOI:
10.1186/s12885-018-4245-5
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for BioMed Central Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center