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Nat Plants. 2018 Apr;4(4):205-211. doi: 10.1038/s41477-018-0123-z. Epub 2018 Mar 26.

A group of receptor kinases are essential for CLAVATA signalling to maintain stem cell homeostasis.

Author information

1
Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Cell Activities and Stress Adaptations, School of Life Sciences, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou, China.
2
Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Cell Activities and Stress Adaptations, School of Life Sciences, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou, China. gouxp@lzu.edu.cn.

Abstract

Continuous organ initiation and outgrowth in plants relies on the proliferation and differentiation of stem cells maintained by the CLAVATA (CLV)-WUSCHEL (WUS) negative-feedback loop1-3. Leucine-rich repeat receptor-like protein kinases (LRR-RLKs), including CLV1, BARELY ANY MERISTEMS and RECEPTOR-LIKE PROTEIN KINASE 2 (RPK2), a receptor-like protein CLV2 and a pseudokinase CORYNE (CRN) are involved in the perception of the CLV3 signal to repress WUS expression4-10. WUS, a homeodomain transcription factor, in turn directly activates CLV3 expression and promotes stem cell activity in the shoot apical meristem11,12. However, the signalling mechanism immediately following the perception of CLV3 by its receptors is poorly understood. Here, we show that a group of LRR-RLKs, designated as CLAVATA3 INSENSITIVE RECEPTOR KINASES (CIKs), have essential roles in regulating CLV3-mediated stem cell homeostasis. The cik1 2 3 4 quadruple mutant exhibits a significantly enlarged SAM, resembling clv mutants. Genetic analyses and biochemical assays demonstrated that CIKs function as co-receptors of CLV1, CLV2/CRN and RPK2 to mediate CLV3 signalling through phosphorylation. Our findings not only widen the understanding of the underlying mechanism of CLV3 signal transduction in regulating stem cell fate but also reveal a novel group of RLKs that function as co-receptors to possibly mediate multiple extrinsic and intrinsic signals during plant growth and development.

PMID:
29581511
DOI:
10.1038/s41477-018-0123-z

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