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Biochim Biophys Acta Biomembr. 2018 Mar 24. pii: S0005-2736(18)30097-X. doi: 10.1016/j.bbamem.2018.03.017. [Epub ahead of print]

Interactions of amyloid-β peptides on lipid bilayer studied by single molecule imaging and tracking.

Author information

1
Department of Biophysics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA.
2
Program in Chemical Biology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA.
3
Department of Biophysics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA; Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA; Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA.
4
Department of Biophysics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA; Department of Biological Chemistry, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA. Electronic address: arigafni@umich.edu.

Abstract

The amyloid-β peptides (Aβ40 and Aβ42) feature prominently in the synaptic dysfunction and neuronal loss associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD). This has been proposed to be due either to interactions between Aβ and cell surface receptors affecting cell signaling, or to the formation of calcium-permeable channels in the membrane that disrupt calcium homeostasis. In both mechanisms the cell membrane is the primary cellular structure with which Aβ interacts. Aβ concentrations in human bodily fluids are very low (pM-nM) rendering studies of the size, composition, cellular binding sites and mechanism of action of the oligomers formed in vivo very challenging. Most studies, therefore, have utilized Aβ oligomers prepared at micromolar peptide concentrations, where Aβ forms oligomeric species which possess easily observable cell toxicity. Such toxicity has not been observed when nM concentrations of peptide are used in the experiment highlighting the importance of employing physiologically relevant peptide concentrations for the results to be of biological significance. In this paper single-molecule microscopy was used to monitor Aβ oligomer formation and diffusion on a supported lipid bilayer at nanomolar peptide concentrations. Aβ monomers, the dominant species in solution, tightly associate with the membrane and are highly mobile whereas trimers and higher-order oligomers are largely immobile. Aβ dimers exist in a mixture of mobile and immobile states. Oligomer growth on the membrane is more rapid for Aβ40 than for the more amyloidogenic Aβ42 but is largely inhibited for a 1:1 Aβ40:Aβ42 mixture. The mechanism underlying these Aβ40-Aβ42 interactions may feature in Alzheimer's pathology.

KEYWORDS:

Alzheimer's disease; Lipid bilayer, Single molecule microscopy; Oligomer; Single particle tracking; β-Amyloid peptides

PMID:
29580771
DOI:
10.1016/j.bbamem.2018.03.017
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