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Psychosomatics. 2018 Jul - Aug;59(4):369-378. doi: 10.1016/j.psym.2017.12.003. Epub 2017 Dec 13.

Prevalence and Predictors of Depression Among Patients With Epilepsy, Stroke, and Multiple Sclerosis Using the Cleveland Clinic Knowledge Program Within the Neurological Institute.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry, Neurological Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH. Electronic address: viguera@ccf.org.
2
Center for Outcomes Research & Evaluation, Neurological Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH.
3
Neurological Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine of Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH.
4
Department of Neurology, Neurological Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH.
5
Center for Outcomes Research & Evaluation, Neurological Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH; Department of Neurology, Neurological Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Neurological conditions carry a high risk of depression. Given this risk, the Neurological Institute (NI) at Cleveland Clinic has initiated systematic screening for depression using the 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) embedded within its electronic medical record and its data capture system, the Knowledge Program (KP)1.

OBJECTIVE:

We sought to (1) estimate the prevalence of depression among patients with epilepsy, stroke, and multiple sclerosis (MS); (2) identify risk factors for depression within each disease; and (3) determine differential risks and predictors across neurological disorders.

METHODS:

The KP1 database provided information on approximately 23,000 visits involving 7946 outpatients with epilepsy, stroke, or MS seen in neurology specialty clinics. The primary outcome measure was depression as defined as a PHQ-9 ≥ 10.

RESULTS:

Overall, the point prevalence of depression was 29.0%. For stroke, epilepsy, and MS, prevalence of depression was 23% (95% CI: 21-25%), 33% (95% CI: 31-35%), and 29% (95% CI: 28-30%), respectively. For all 3 conditions, increasing disease severity and decreased health-related quality of life were independent predictors of depression. In multivariable models, there was a significant interaction between age and condition, and condition with disease severity. In stroke and MS, increasing age was associated with reduced odds for depression, whereas in epilepsy, increasing age was associated with an increased odds for depression.

CONCLUSIONS:

Although depression is common among patients with neurological disorders, our data suggest that predictors of depression such as age and disease severity varied by condition, supporting important possible phenomenological and pathophysiological differences of depression across these neurological conditions.

KEYWORDS:

Depression; Epilepsy; Multiple sclerosis; Patient health questionnaire; Predictors.; Stroke

PMID:
29580558
DOI:
10.1016/j.psym.2017.12.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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