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BMC Psychiatry. 2018 Mar 27;18(1):76. doi: 10.1186/s12888-018-1668-0.

Psychotropic medication use among patients with celiac disease.

Author information

1
Division of Digestive and Liver Diseases, Department of Medicine, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, USA.
2
The Celiac Disease Center at Columbia University, 180 Fort Washington Avenue, Suite 936, New York, NY, 10032, USA.
3
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska University Hospital and Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
4
Department of Pediatrics, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
5
Division of Digestive and Liver Diseases, Department of Medicine, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, USA. BL114@columbia.edu.
6
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska University Hospital and Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. BL114@columbia.edu.
7
Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York, USA. BL114@columbia.edu.
8
The Celiac Disease Center at Columbia University, 180 Fort Washington Avenue, Suite 936, New York, NY, 10032, USA. BL114@columbia.edu.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Celiac disease is a multi-system disorder with manifestations that may result in psychiatric disorders. We assessed the prevalence of medication use to treat psychiatric disorders in celiac disease patients.

METHODS:

We conducted a cross-sectional study of patients undergoing esophagogastroduodenoscopy over 9-years at a celiac disease referral center. We compared the prevalence of psychotropic medication use among celiac disease patients (n = 1293) to a control group (n = 1401) with abdominal pain or reflux.

RESULTS:

Among all patients the mean age was 48.4 years, most were female (69.5%), and 22.7% used any psychotropic medication. There was no difference between overall psychotropic medication use among celiac disease patients and controls (23.9% vs 21.8%, OR 1.16; 95% CI 0.96-1.39, p = 0.12). However, those with celiac disease were more likely to use antidepressants on univariate (16.4% vs 13.4%, p = 0.03) and multivariate analysis (OR 1.28; 95% CI 1.03-1.59; p = 0.03). Use of psychotropic medications was not associated with disease duration or mode of presentation of celiac disease.

CONCLUSIONS:

Celiac disease patients use psychotropic medications at similar rates as those with other gastrointestinal diseases, though subgroup analysis suggests they may use more antidepressants. Future studies should investigate whether celiac disease is associated with mood disorders that are not treated with medications.

KEYWORDS:

Anxiety; Celiac disease; Depression; Epidemiology; Psychiatric disorders

PMID:
29580225
PMCID:
PMC5870752
DOI:
10.1186/s12888-018-1668-0
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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