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J Chromatogr B Analyt Technol Biomed Life Sci. 2018 May 1;1084:96-105. doi: 10.1016/j.jchromb.2018.03.024. Epub 2018 Mar 19.

Major signal suppression from metal ion clusters in SFC/ESI-MS - Cause and effects.

Author information

1
Division of Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Uppsala University, BMC Box 574, SE-751 23 Uppsala, Sweden. Electronic address: alfred.svan@ilk.uu.se.
2
Division of Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Uppsala University, BMC Box 574, SE-751 23 Uppsala, Sweden; National Veterinary Institute (SVA), Dept. of Chemistry, Environment and Feed Hygiene, SE-751 89 Uppsala, Sweden.
3
Division of Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Uppsala University, BMC Box 574, SE-751 23 Uppsala, Sweden; Medical Products Agency, Box 26, SE-751 03 Uppsala, Sweden.
4
Division of Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Uppsala University, BMC Box 574, SE-751 23 Uppsala, Sweden.

Abstract

The widening application area of SFC-MS with polar analytes and water-containing samples facilitates the use of quick and simple sample preparation techniques such as "dilute and shoot" and protein precipitation. This has also introduced new polar interfering components such as alkali metal ions naturally abundant in e.g. blood plasma and urine, which have shown to be retained using screening conditions in SFC/ESI-TOF-MS and causing areas of major ion suppression. Analytes co-eluting with these clusters will have a decreased signal intensity, which might have a major effect on both quantification and identification. When investigating the composition of the alkali metal clusters using accurate mass and isotopic pattern, it could be concluded that they were previously not described in the literature. Using NaCl and KCl standards and different chromatographic conditions, varying e.g. column and modifier, the clusters proved to be formed from the alkali metal ions in combination with the alcohol modifier and make-up solvent. Their compositions were [(XOCH3)n + X]+, [(XOH)n + X]+, [(X2CO3)n + X]+ and [(XOOCOCH3)n + X]+ for X = Na+ or K+ in ESI+. In ESI-, the clusters depended more on modifier, with [(XCl)n + Cl]- and [(XOCH3)n + OCH3]- mainly formed in pure methanol and [(XOOCH)n + OOCH]- when 20 mM NH4Fa was added. To prevent the formation of the clusters by avoiding methanol as modifier might be difficult, as this is a widely used modifier providing good solubility when analyzing polar compounds in SFC. A sample preparation with e.g. LLE would remove the alkali ions, however also introducing a time consuming and discriminating step into the method. Since the alkali metal ions were retained and affected by chromatographic adjustments as e.g. mobile phase modifications, a way to avoid them could therefore be chromatographic tuning, when analyzing samples containing them.

KEYWORDS:

Alkali metal; ESI; Ion cluster; Matrix effect; SFC-MS; Supercritical fluid chromatography

PMID:
29579734
DOI:
10.1016/j.jchromb.2018.03.024
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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