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Cancer. 2018 Apr 1;124 Suppl 7:1535-1542. doi: 10.1002/cncr.31116.

Results of a lay health education intervention to increase colorectal cancer screening among Filipino Americans: A cluster randomized controlled trial.

Author information

1
Student Equity, Excellence and Diversity, University of Hawai'i-Mãnoa, Honolulu, Hawai'i.
2
John A. Burns School of Medicine, University of Hawai'i, Honolulu, Hawai'i.
3
Department of Medicine, University of California-San Francisco, San Franciso, California.
4
Department of Hematology-Oncology, Straub Clinic and Hospital, Honolulu, Hawai'i.
5
Division of General Internal Medicine, University of California-San Francisco, San Franciso, California.
6
Department of Psychiatry, University of California-San Francisco, San Franciso, California.
7
Department of Family Medicine, University of California-Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California.
8
Department of Internal Medicine, University of California-Davis, Davis, California.
9
Fielding School of Public Health, University of California-Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California.
10
Division of Public Health Sciences, University of California-Davis, Davis, California.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Filipino colorectal cancer (CRC) screening rates fall below Healthy People 2020 goals. In this study, the authors explore whether a lay health educator (LHE) approach can increase CRC screening among Filipino Americans ages 50 to 75 years in Hawai'i.

METHODS:

A cluster randomized controlled trial from 2012 through 2015 compared an intervention, which consisted of LHEs delivering 2 education sessions and 2 telephone follow-up calls on CRC screening plus a CRC brochure versus an attention control, in which 2 lectures and 2 follow-up calls on nutrition and physical activity plus a CRC brochure were provided. The primary outcome was change in self-reported ever receipt of CRC screening at 6 months.

RESULTS:

Among 304 participants (77% women, 86% had > 10 years of residence in the United States), the proportion of participants who reported ever having received CRC screening increased significantly in the intervention group (from 80% to 89%; P = .0003), but not in the control group (from 73% to 74%; P = .60). After covariate adjustment, there was a significant intervention effect (odds ratio, 1.9; 95% confidence interval, 1.0-3.5). There was no intervention effect on up-to-date screening.

CONCLUSIONS:

This first randomized controlled trial for CRC screening among Hawai'i's Filipinos used an LHE intervention with mixed, but promising, results. Cancer 2018;124:1535-42. © 2018 American Cancer Society.

KEYWORDS:

Asian American; Hawai’i; cancer screening; colorectal cancer; lay health educator

PMID:
29578603
DOI:
10.1002/cncr.31116

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