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Acta Biomater. 2018 May;72:287-294. doi: 10.1016/j.actbio.2018.03.029. Epub 2018 Mar 22.

BaTiO3-core Au-shell nanoparticles for photothermal therapy and bimodal imaging.

Author information

1
Laboratory for Biomaterials and Drug Delivery, Department of Anesthesiology, Division of Critical Care Medicine, Boston Children's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 300 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, United States.
2
Laboratory for Biomaterials and Drug Delivery, Department of Anesthesiology, Division of Critical Care Medicine, Boston Children's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 300 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, United States. Electronic address: Daniel.kohane@childrens.harvard.edu.

Abstract

We report sub-100 nm metal-shell (Au) dielectric-core (BaTiO3) nanoparticles with bimodal imaging abilities and enhanced photothermal effects. The nanoparticles efficiently absorb light in the near infrared range of the spectrum and convert it to heat to ablate tumors. Their BaTiO3 core, a highly ordered non-centrosymmetric material, can be imaged by second harmonic generation, and their Au shell generates two-photon luminescence. The intrinsic dual imaging capability allows investigating the distribution of the nanoparticles in relation to the tumor vasculature morphology during photothermal ablation. Our design enabled in vivo real-time tracking of the BT-Au-NPs and observation of their thermally-induced effect on tumor vessels.

STATEMENT OF SIGNIFICANCE:

Photothermal therapy induced by plasmonic nanoparticles has emerged as a promising approach to treating cancer. However, the study of the role of intratumoral nanoparticle distribution in mediating tumoricidal activity has been hampered by the lack of suitable imaging techniques. This work describes metal-shell (Au) dielectric-core (BaTiO3) nanoparticles (abbreviated as BT-Au-NP) for photothermal therapy and bimodal imaging. We demonstrated that sub-100 nm BT-Au-NP can efficiently absorb near infrared light and convert it to heat to ablate tumors. The intrinsic dual imaging capability allowed us to investigate the distribution of the nanoparticles in relation to the tumor vasculature morphology during photothermal ablation, enabling in vivo real-time tracking of the BT-Au-NPs and observation of their thermally-induced effect on tumor vessels.

KEYWORDS:

Metal-shell dielectric-core nanoparticles; Near-infrared absorption; Photothermal therapy; Second harmonic generation imaging; Two-photon luminescence imaging

PMID:
29578086
PMCID:
PMC5938150
DOI:
10.1016/j.actbio.2018.03.029
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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