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Cell Metab. 2018 Apr 3;27(4):805-815.e4. doi: 10.1016/j.cmet.2018.02.019. Epub 2018 Mar 22.

Metabolic Slowing and Reduced Oxidative Damage with Sustained Caloric Restriction Support the Rate of Living and Oxidative Damage Theories of Aging.

Author information

1
Division of Clinical Sciences Pennington, Biomedical Research Center, 6400 Perkins Road, Baton Rouge, LA 70808, USA. Electronic address: leanne.redman@pbrc.edu.
2
Translational Research Institute for Metabolism and Diabetes, Florida Hospital and Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute, Orlando, FL 32804, USA.
3
Division of Clinical Sciences Pennington, Biomedical Research Center, 6400 Perkins Road, Baton Rouge, LA 70808, USA.
4
School of Public Health, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA 30302, USA.

Abstract

Calorie restriction (CR) is a dietary intervention with potential benefits for healthspan improvement and lifespan extension. In 53 (34 CR and 19 control) non-obese adults, we tested the hypothesis that energy expenditure (EE) and its endocrine mediators are reduced with a CR diet over 2 years. Approximately 15% CR was achieved over 2 years, resulting in an average 8.7 kg weight loss, whereas controls gained 1.8 kg. In the CR group, EE measured over 24 hr or during sleep was approximately 80-120 kcal/day lower than expected on the basis of weight loss, indicating sustained metabolic adaptation over 2 years. This metabolic adaptation was accompanied by significantly reduced thyroid axis activity and reactive oxygen species (F2-isoprostane) production. Findings from this 2-year CR trial in healthy, non-obese humans provide new evidence of persistent metabolic slowing accompanied by reduced oxidative stress, which supports the rate of living and oxidative damage theories of mammalian aging.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00427193 NCT02695511.

KEYWORDS:

aging; energy expenditure; intervention; nutrition

PMID:
29576535
PMCID:
PMC5886711
DOI:
10.1016/j.cmet.2018.02.019
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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