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Cell Immunol. 2018 Nov;333:46-57. doi: 10.1016/j.cellimm.2018.03.007. Epub 2018 Mar 20.

Glycosylation in cancer: Selected roles in tumour progression, immune modulation and metastasis.

Author information

1
I3S - Instituto de Investigação e Inovação em Saúde, Universidade do Porto, 4200-135 Porto, Portugal; Institute of Molecular Pathology and Immunology, University of Porto, 4200-135 Porto, Portugal. Electronic address: jrodrigues@ipatimup.pt.
2
I3S - Instituto de Investigação e Inovação em Saúde, Universidade do Porto, 4200-135 Porto, Portugal; Institute of Molecular Pathology and Immunology, University of Porto, 4200-135 Porto, Portugal. Electronic address: mbalmana@ipatimup.pt.
3
I3S - Instituto de Investigação e Inovação em Saúde, Universidade do Porto, 4200-135 Porto, Portugal; Institute of Molecular Pathology and Immunology, University of Porto, 4200-135 Porto, Portugal. Electronic address: jmacedo@ipatimup.pt.
4
I3S - Instituto de Investigação e Inovação em Saúde, Universidade do Porto, 4200-135 Porto, Portugal; Institute of Molecular Pathology and Immunology, University of Porto, 4200-135 Porto, Portugal. Electronic address: jpocas@ipatimup.pt.
5
I3S - Instituto de Investigação e Inovação em Saúde, Universidade do Porto, 4200-135 Porto, Portugal; Institute of Molecular Pathology and Immunology, University of Porto, 4200-135 Porto, Portugal. Electronic address: angelaf@ipatimup.pt.
6
Cellular and Molecular Oncobiology Program, Brazilian National Cancer Institute (INCA), Rio de Janeiro 20231-050, Brazil. Electronic address: jcjunior@inca.gov.br.
7
I3S - Instituto de Investigação e Inovação em Saúde, Universidade do Porto, 4200-135 Porto, Portugal; Institute of Molecular Pathology and Immunology, University of Porto, 4200-135 Porto, Portugal; Faculty of Medicine, University of Porto, 4200-319 Porto, Portugal. Electronic address: salomep@ipatimup.pt.
8
I3S - Instituto de Investigação e Inovação em Saúde, Universidade do Porto, 4200-135 Porto, Portugal; Institute of Molecular Pathology and Immunology, University of Porto, 4200-135 Porto, Portugal. Electronic address: joanag@ipatimup.pt.
9
I3S - Instituto de Investigação e Inovação em Saúde, Universidade do Porto, 4200-135 Porto, Portugal; Institute of Molecular Pathology and Immunology, University of Porto, 4200-135 Porto, Portugal. Electronic address: amagalhaes@ipatimup.pt.
10
I3S - Instituto de Investigação e Inovação em Saúde, Universidade do Porto, 4200-135 Porto, Portugal; Institute of Molecular Pathology and Immunology, University of Porto, 4200-135 Porto, Portugal. Electronic address: cgomes@ipatimup.pt.
11
I3S - Instituto de Investigação e Inovação em Saúde, Universidade do Porto, 4200-135 Porto, Portugal; Institute of Molecular Pathology and Immunology, University of Porto, 4200-135 Porto, Portugal. Electronic address: smereiter@ipatimup.pt.
12
I3S - Instituto de Investigação e Inovação em Saúde, Universidade do Porto, 4200-135 Porto, Portugal; Institute of Molecular Pathology and Immunology, University of Porto, 4200-135 Porto, Portugal; Faculty of Medicine, University of Porto, 4200-319 Porto, Portugal; Instituto de Ciências Biomédicas Abel Salazar, University of Porto, 4050-313 Porto, Portugal. Electronic address: celsor@ipatimup.pt.

Abstract

Tumour metastasis is the main cause of cancer related deaths. Metastasis is an intricate multi-step process that requires the acquisition of several cancer cell features, including the modulation of tumour cell migration, adhesion, invasion, and immune evasion. Changes in the cellular glycosylation are associated with malignant transformation of cancer cells, tumour progression and ultimately, metastasis formation. Glycans have major impact on cellular signalling and on the regulation of tumour cell-cell adhesion and cell-matrix interaction. Glycans drive the interplay between the cancer cells and the tumour microenvironment. In this review, we summarize the roles of glycan alterations in tumour progression, such as acquisition of oncogenic features due to modulation of receptor tyrosine kinases, proteoglycans, cadherins and integrins. We also highlight the importance of key glycan binding proteins such as selectins, siglecs and galectins, which are pivotal in the modulation of immune response. An overview on glycans as cancer biomarkers is also presented.

KEYWORDS:

Biomarkers; Cadherins; Galectins; Glycosylation in cancer; Integrins; Metastasis; Proteoglycans; Receptor tyrosine kinase; Selectins; Siglecs

PMID:
29576316
DOI:
10.1016/j.cellimm.2018.03.007
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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