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J Oral Maxillofac Surg. 2018 Aug;76(8):1677-1687. doi: 10.1016/j.joms.2018.02.021. Epub 2018 Mar 1.

Effect of Obesity or Metabolic Syndrome and Diabetes on Osseointegration of Dental Implants in a Miniature Swine Model: A Pilot Study.

Author information

1
Professor, Department of Biomaterials and Department of Periodontology and Implant Dentistry, New York University College of Dentistry, New York, NY; and Professor, Hanjorg Wyss Department of Plastic Surgery, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY; and Professor, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, New York University Tandon School of Engineering. Electronic address: pc92@nyu.edu.
2
Research and Development, Straumann, Basel, Switzerland.
3
Adjunct Scientist, Department of Biomaterials, New York University College of Dentistry, New York, NY.
4
Senior Scientist, Livestock Research, Wageningen University and Research Center, Wageningen, Netherlands.
5
Research Fellow (NIDCR), Department of Biomaterials, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY.
6
Professor, Department of Periodontics, School of Dental Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA.
7
Associate Professor, Department of Periodontology and Implant Dentistry, New York University College of Dentistry, New York, NY.
8
Assistant Professor, Department of Cardiology, Erasmus University Rotterdam, Rotterdam, Netherlands.
9
Visiting Scholar, Department of Biomaterials, New York University College of Dentistry, New York, NY.
10
Associate Professor, Section of Oral, Diagnostic and Rehabilitation Sciences, College of Dental Medicine, Columbia University, New York, NY; and Global Medical Director, Straumann Group, Basel, Switzerland.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

The increasing prevalence of obesity or metabolic syndrome (O/MS) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) remains a global health concern. Clinically relevant and practical translational models mimicking human characteristics of these conditions are lacking. This study aimed to demonstrate proof of concept of the induction of stable O/MS and type 2 DM in a Göttingen minipig model and validate both of these disease-adjusted Göttingen minipig models as impaired healing models for the testing of dental implants.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

Nine minipigs were split into 3 groups-control (normal diet), obese (cafeteria diet), and diabetic (cafeteria diet plus low-dosage streptozotocin)-followed by placement of dental implants. Inflammatory markers including tumor necrosis factor α, C-reactive protein, and cortisol were recorded for each study group. Removal torque was measured, and histomorphometric analysis (bone-to-implant contact and bone area fraction occupancy) was performed.

RESULTS:

O/MS pigs showed, on average, a 2-fold increase in plasma C-reactive protein (P < .05) and cortisol (P < .09) concentrations compared with controls; DM pigs showed, on average approximately, a 40-fold increase in plasma tumor necrosis factor α levels (P < .05) and a 2-fold increase in cortisol concentrations (P < .05) compared with controls. The impact of O/MS and DM on implants was determined. The torque to interface failure was highest in the control group (200 N-cm) and significantly lower in the O/MS (90 N-cm) and DM (60 N-cm) groups (P < .01). Bone formation around implants was significantly greater in the control group than in the O/MS and DM groups (P < .02).

CONCLUSIONS:

Both O/MS and DM minipigs express a human-like disease phenotype, and both presented bone-healing impairment around dental implants. Our finding of no significant difference between type 2 DM and O/MS in bone formation around implants provides evidence that further investigation of the impact of O/MS is warranted.

PMID:
29572133
PMCID:
PMC6064394
DOI:
10.1016/j.joms.2018.02.021
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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