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Am J Kidney Dis. 2018 Aug;72(2):214-222. doi: 10.1053/j.ajkd.2018.01.030. Epub 2018 Mar 20.

Coffee Consumption and Incident Kidney Disease: Results From the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study.

Author information

1
Welch Center for Prevention, Epidemiology, and Clinical Research, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD; Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD.
2
Welch Center for Prevention, Epidemiology, and Clinical Research, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD; Division of Nephrology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD.
3
Division of Epidemiology and Community Health, University of Minnesota School of Public Health, Minneapolis, MN.
4
Welch Center for Prevention, Epidemiology, and Clinical Research, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD; Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD. Electronic address: crebhol1@jhu.edu.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Moderate coffee consumption has been suggested to be associated with lower risk for chronic conditions such as diabetes, a major precursor to chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, the association between coffee and CKD has not been fully established. STUDY DESIGN: Prospective cohort study.

SETTING & PARTICIPANTS:

14,209 participants aged 45 to 64 years from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study.

PREDICTORS:

Coffee consumption (cups per day) was assessed at visits 1 (1987-1989) and 3 (1993-1995) using food frequency questionnaires.

OUTCOMES:

Incident CKD defined as estimated glomerular filtration rate < 60mL/min/1.73m2 accompanied by ≥25% estimated glomerular filtration rate decline, CKD-related hospitalization or death, or end-stage renal disease.

RESULTS:

There were 3,845 cases of incident CKD over a median of 24 years of follow-up. Men, whites, current smokers, and participants without comorbid conditions were more likely to consume higher amounts of coffee per day. After adjustment for demographic, clinical, and dietary factors, higher categories of coffee consumption were associated with lower risk for incident CKD compared with those who never consumed coffee (HR for <1 cup per day, 0.90 [95% CI, 0.82-0.99]; 1-<2 cups per day, 0.90 [95% CI, 0.82-0.99]; 2-<3 cups per day, 0.87 [95% CI, 0.77-0.97]; and ≥3 cups per day, 0.84 [95% CI, 0.75-0.94]). In continuous analysis, for each additional cup of coffee consumed per day, risk for incident CKD was lower by 3% (HR, 0.97; 95% CI, 0.95-0.99; P<0.001).

LIMITATIONS:

Self-reported coffee consumption and observational design.

CONCLUSIONS:

Participants who drank higher amounts of coffee had lower risk for incident CKD after adjusting for covariates. Coffee consumers may not be at adverse risk for kidney disease.

KEYWORDS:

Coffee; beverages; chronic kidney disease (CKD); diet; incident CKD; kidney failure; modifiable risk factor

PMID:
29571833
PMCID:
PMC6057809
[Available on 2019-08-01]
DOI:
10.1053/j.ajkd.2018.01.030

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