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Annu Rev Biochem. 2018 Jun 20;87:451-478. doi: 10.1146/annurev-biochem-062917-011942. Epub 2018 Mar 23.

Ribosome-Targeting Antibiotics: Modes of Action, Mechanisms of Resistance, and Implications for Drug Design.

Author information

1
State Key Laboratory of Genetic Engineering, School of Life Sciences, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai 200438, China; email: linjinzhong@fudan.edu.cn.
2
Department of Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520, USA; email: thomas.steitz@yale.edu.
3
Department of Chemistry, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520, USA.
4
Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520, USA.
5
Department of Biological Sciences, and Department of Medicinal Chemistry and Pharmacognosy, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60607, USA; email: yuryp@uic.edu.
6
Current affiliation: Department of Microbiology and Immunology, and Sealy Center for Structural Biology and Molecular Biophysics, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas 77555, USA; email: magagnon@utmb.edu.

Abstract

Genetic information is translated into proteins by the ribosome. Structural studies of the ribosome and of its complexes with factors and inhibitors have provided invaluable information on the mechanism of protein synthesis. Ribosome inhibitors are among the most successful antimicrobial drugs and constitute more than half of all medicines used to treat infections. However, bacterial infections are becoming increasingly difficult to treat because the microbes have developed resistance to the most effective antibiotics, creating a major public health care threat. This has spurred a renewed interest in structure-function studies of protein synthesis inhibitors, and in few cases, compounds have been developed into potent therapeutic agents against drug-resistant pathogens. In this review, we describe the modes of action of many ribosome-targeting antibiotics, highlight the major resistance mechanisms developed by pathogenic bacteria, and discuss recent advances in structure-assisted design of new molecules.

KEYWORDS:

antibiotic resistance; antibiotics; drug design; mechanisms of inhibition; protein synthesis; ribosome

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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