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Antimicrob Resist Infect Control. 2018 Mar 20;7:41. doi: 10.1186/s13756-018-0323-3. eCollection 2018.

Prevalence and antibiotic resistance of bacteria isolated from the cerebrospinal fluid of neurosurgical patients at Peking Union Medical College Hospital.

Author information

1
Department of Neurosurgery, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Peking Union Medical College, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, No.1 Shuaifuyuan, Dongcheng District, Beijing, 100730 China.
2
Department of Laboratory Medicine, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Peking Union Medical College, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, No.1 Shuaifuyuan, Dongcheng District, Beijing, 100730 China.
#
Contributed equally

Abstract

Background:

Postoperative central nervous system infections (PCNSIs) represent a serious complication, and the timely use of antibiotics guided by the identification of the causative pathogens and their antibiotic sensitivities is essential for treatment. However, there are little data regarding the prevalence of PCNSI pathogens in China. The aim of this study is to investigate the features of pathogens in patients with PCNSIs, which could help clinicians to choose the appropriate empirical antibiotic therapy.

Methods:

We retrospectively examined the positive CSF cultures in patients who underwent craniotomy between January 2010 and December 2015. We collected data, including demographic characteristics, type of neurosurgery, laboratory data, causative organisms and antimicrobial susceptibility testing results.

Results:

A total of 62 patients with 90 isolates out of 818 patients with 2433 CSF culture samples were available for data analysis. The estimated incidence and culture-positive rate of PCNSIs were approximately 0.9 and 7.5%, respectively. The predominant organism was coagulase-negative staphylococci, of which most were methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci (MRCoNS). All were susceptible to vancomycin, linezolid, rifampicin and amoxicillin-clavulanate. Acinetobacter baumannii was the most frequent causative Gram-negative agent and was resistant to 12 out of 18 antimicrobials tested. The sensitivity rates for tigecycline and minocycline were only 40 and 33%, respectively.

Conclusion:

PCNSIs could lead to high mortality. Although the MRCoNS were the predominant organism, the management of Acinetobacter baumannii was a major clinical challenge with few effective antimicrobials in PCNSIs.

KEYWORDS:

Antibiotic resistance; Central nervous system infections; Neurosurgery; Prevalence

Conflict of interest statement

This study was approved by the Ethics Committee of Peking Union Medical College Hospital (PUMCH) and written informed consents were obtained from all patients.All the authors approve and agree the article to this publication.The authors declare that they have no competing interests.Springer Nature remains neutral with regard to jurisdictional claims in published maps and institutional affiliations.

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