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Nat Chem. 2018 Apr;10(4):383-394. doi: 10.1038/s41557-018-0021-z. Epub 2018 Mar 22.

Organic synthesis provides opportunities to transform drug discovery.

Author information

1
Medicinal Sciences, Pfizer, Inc. Eastern Point Road, Groton, CT, USA.
2
UCB, Slough, Berkshire, UK.
3
GSK Medicines Research Centre, Stevenage, UK.
4
BenevolentBio, London, UK.
5
Astex Pharmaceuticals, Cambridge, UK. david.rees@astx.com.
6
Roche Pharma Research and Early Development (pRED), Roche Innovation Center Basel, F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd, Basel, Switzerland.
7
Oncology, IMED Biotech Unit, AstraZeneca, Cambridge, UK.
8
Medicinal Sciences, Pfizer, Inc., Cambridge, MA, USA.
9
GSK, Stevenage, UK.

Abstract

Despite decades of ground-breaking research in academia, organic synthesis is still a rate-limiting factor in drug-discovery projects. Here we present some current challenges in synthetic organic chemistry from the perspective of the pharmaceutical industry and highlight problematic steps that, if overcome, would find extensive application in the discovery of transformational medicines. Significant synthesis challenges arise from the fact that drug molecules typically contain amines and N-heterocycles, as well as unprotected polar groups. There is also a need for new reactions that enable non-traditional disconnections, more C-H bond activation and late-stage functionalization, as well as stereoselectively substituted aliphatic heterocyclic ring synthesis, C-X or C-C bond formation. We also emphasize that syntheses compatible with biomacromolecules will find increasing use, while new technologies such as machine-assisted approaches and artificial intelligence for synthesis planning have the potential to dramatically accelerate the drug-discovery process. We believe that increasing collaboration between academic and industrial chemists is crucial to address the challenges outlined here.

PMID:
29568051
DOI:
10.1038/s41557-018-0021-z

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