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Spine J. 2018 Oct;18(10):1815-1821. doi: 10.1016/j.spinee.2018.03.010. Epub 2018 Mar 19.

In-hospital complication rate following microendoscopic versus open lumbar laminectomy: a propensity score-matched analysis.

Author information

1
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Sensory and Motor System Medicine, Surgical Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-8655, Japan.
2
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Sensory and Motor System Medicine, Surgical Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-8655, Japan. Electronic address: yoo-tky@umin.ac.jp.
3
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Sensory and Motor System Medicine, Surgical Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-8655, Japan; Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, 3-39-22 Showa, Maebashi, Gunma 371-8511 Japan.
4
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Sensory and Motor System Medicine, Surgical Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-8655, Japan; Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Japan Community Health Care Organization Tokyo Shinjuku Medical Center, 5-1 Tsukudo-cho Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, 162-8543, Japan.
5
Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Health Economics, School of Public Health, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-0033, Japan.
6
Department of Health Policy and Informatics, Tokyo Medical and Dental University Graduate School, 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8519, Japan.

Abstract

BACKGROUND CONTEXT:

The incidence of postoperative complications after microendoscopic laminectomy (MEL) has not been compared with that after open laminectomy in a large study, so it is not clear whether MEL is a safer procedure.

PURPOSE:

The objective of this study was to compare postoperative morbidity and mortality following lumbar laminectomy between patients treated with MEL and with open laminectomy.

STUDY DESIGN:

This is a retrospective cohort study with propensity score-matched analysis.

PATIENT SAMPLE:

Data of patients who underwent elective spinal surgery between July 2010 and March 2013 were extracted from the Diagnosis Procedure Combination database, a nationwide inpatient database in Japan.

OUTCOME MEASURES:

Clinical outcomes included length of hospital stay, occurrence of major complications (cardiac events, respiratory complications, pulmonary embolism, stroke, and acute renal failure), surgical site infection (SSI), postoperative delirium, and in-hospital death.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

Propensity score matching was performed to adjust for measured confounding factors, including patient age, sex, Charlson Comorbidity Index, body mass index, smoking status, blood transfusion, duration of anesthesia, number of operated disc levels, and type of hospital and hospital volumes. The clinical outcomes of one-to-one propensity-matched pairs of the MEL and the open laminectomy groups were compared.

RESULTS:

Of 23,317 patients identified in the database, 1,536 underwent MEL (6.6%). By one-to-one propensity score matching, 1,536 pairs were selected. The distributions of patient backgrounds were closely balanced between the MEL and the open laminectomy groups. An analysis of 1,536 pairs revealed that there was a significantly lower incidence of major postoperative complications in those who underwent MEL (1.0% vs. 2.8% for open laminectomy, risk difference 1.8%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.9%-2.9%), SSI (0.5% vs. 1.6% for open laminectomy, risk difference 1.1%, 95% CI 0.4%-1.9%), and postoperative delirium (1.1% vs. 2.3% for open laminectomy, risk difference1.2%, 95% CI 0.3%-2.1%). The length of hospital stay was significantly shorter in those treated with MEL (12 days vs. 16 days for open laminectomy, p<.001). There was no significant difference in in-hospital mortality between the groups.

CONCLUSIONS:

Patients who underwent MEL were significantly less likely to experience major postoperative complications and were less likely to develop SSI and postoperative delirium than those who underwent open laminectomy.

KEYWORDS:

Complication; Endoscopic surgery; Laminectomy; Lumbar spine; Minimally invasive surgery; National database

PMID:
29567515
DOI:
10.1016/j.spinee.2018.03.010
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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