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PLoS One. 2018 Mar 22;13(3):e0194157. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0194157. eCollection 2018.

Paper-based sensors for rapid detection of virulence factor produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

Author information

1
Department of Micro- and Nanotechnology, Technical University of Denmark, Lyngby, Denmark.
2
Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Biosustainability, Technical University of Denmark, Lyngby, Denmark.
3
Department of Bioengineering and Biomedicine, Technical University of Denmark, Lyngby, Denmark.
4
IPM - Intelligent Pollutant Monitoring ApS, Lyngby, Denmark.
5
Department of Applied Mathematics and Computer Science, Technical University of Denmark, Lyngby Denmark.
6
Department of Science and Environment, Roskilde University, Roskilde, Denmark.
7
Department of Clinical Microbiology, University Hospital Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark.
8
Department of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.

Abstract

Pyocyanin is a toxin produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Here we describe a novel paper-based electrochemical sensor for pyocyanin detection, manufactured with a simple and inexpensive approach based on electrode printing on paper. The resulting sensors constitute an effective electrochemical method to quantify pyocyanin in bacterial cultures without the conventional time consuming pretreatment of the samples. The electrochemical properties of the paper-based sensors were evaluated by ferri/ferrocyanide as a redox mediator, and showed reliable sensing performance. The paper-based sensors readily allow for the determination of pyocyanin in bacterial cultures with high reproducibility, achieving a limit of detection of 95 nM and a sensitivity of 4.30 μA/μM in standard culture media. Compared to the similar commercial ceramic based sensors, it is a 2.3-fold enhanced performance. The simple in-house fabrication of sensors for pyocyanin quantification allows researchers to understand in vitro adaptation of P. aeruginosa infections via rapid screenings of bacterial cultures that otherwise are expensive and time-consuming.

PMID:
29566025
PMCID:
PMC5863975
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0194157
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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