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Disaster Med Public Health Prep. 2018 Feb;12(1):121-126. doi: 10.1017/dmp.2017.30.

Preparing for the Surge: A Half-Day Emergency Preparedness Training Course for the "Second Front".

Author information

1
1Associate Professor, College of Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina,and Chief of Emergency Medicine at Ralph H. Johnson Veterans Medical Center, Charleston,South Carolina.
2
2Emergency Medicine Resident Physician,Emory University College of Medicine,Atlanta,Georgia.
3
4Research Instructor, Department of Public Health Sciences,Medical University of South Carolina,Charleston,South Carolina.
4
3Assistant Professor, College of Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston,South Carolina.

Abstract

Purpose Clinical disaster medicine requires providers working collaboratively to care for multiple patients, yet many clinicians lack competency-based training. A 5-hour emergency preparedness training (EPT) curriculum was created using didactics, small group discussion, and scenario-based learning. The goal was to evaluate the effect of a short course on improving clinical-provider knowledge, confidence and skill.

METHODS:

Participants were enrolled in a medical university between 2011 and 2014. The course consisted of didactic lectures, small group exercises, and live mass-casualty training scenarios. Core competencies and performance objectives were developed by a task force and assessed via facilitator observation, pre- and posttesting, and a course evaluation.

RESULTS:

A total of 708 participants were trained, including 49.9% physicians, 31.9% medical students, 7.2% nurses, and 11% allied health personnel. The average percentage of correct answers increased from 39% to 60% (P<0.01). Following didactics, trainees met 73% and 96% of small group performance objectives. Trainees also met 68.5% and 61.1% of the mass-casualty performance objectives. Average trainee self-assessment of disaster-preparedness skill improved from 36 to 73 points out of 100.

CONCLUSION:

A brief, intensive EPT course can improve the disaster knowledge and comfort level of a diverse group of clinical providers as well as foster disaster-performance skills. (Disaster Med Public Health Preparedness. 2018;12:121-126).

KEYWORDS:

disaster medicine; disasters; emergency management; emergency preparedness; medical education

PMID:
29565241
PMCID:
PMC5868427
[Available on 2019-02-01]
DOI:
10.1017/dmp.2017.30

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