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Nat Commun. 2018 Mar 21;9(1):1179. doi: 10.1038/s41467-018-03205-z.

The global distribution and spread of the mobilized colistin resistance gene mcr-1.

Author information

1
Department of Clinical Laboratory, Peking University People's Hospital, Beijing, 100044, China.
2
UCL Genetics Institute, University College London, Gower Street, London, WC1E 6BT, UK.
3
Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, University of Oxford, Oxford, OX3 7BN, UK.
4
Institute of Animal Science and Veterinary Medicine, Shandong Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Shandong Province, Jinan, 250100, China.
5
UMR PVBMT, CIRAD, 97410, St Pierre, Reunion, France.
6
Division of Infection and Pathway Medicine, 49 Little France Crescent, Edinburgh, EH16 4SB, UK.
7
Department of Veterinary Medicine, Cambridge, CB3 0ES, UK.
8
European Molecular Biology Laboratory, European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI), Wellcome Genome Campus, Cambridge, CB10 1SD, UK.
9
Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Imperial College London, Norfolk Place 21, London, W2 1PG, UK.
10
Department of Clinical Laboratory, Peking University People's Hospital, Beijing, 100044, China. wanghui@pkuph.edu.cn.
11
UCL Genetics Institute, University College London, Gower Street, London, WC1E 6BT, UK. f.balloux@ucl.ac.uk.

Abstract

Colistin represents one of the few available drugs for treating infections caused by carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae. As such, the recent plasmid-mediated spread of the colistin resistance gene mcr-1 poses a significant public health threat, requiring global monitoring and surveillance. Here, we characterize the global distribution of mcr-1 using a data set of 457 mcr-1-positive sequenced isolates. We find mcr-1 in various plasmid types but identify an immediate background common to all mcr-1 sequences. Our analyses establish that all mcr-1 elements in circulation descend from the same initial mobilization of mcr-1 by an ISApl1 transposon in the mid 2000s (2002-2008; 95% highest posterior density), followed by a marked demographic expansion, which led to its current global distribution. Our results provide the first systematic phylogenetic analysis of the origin and spread of mcr-1, and emphasize the importance of understanding the movement of antibiotic resistance genes across multiple levels of genomic organization.

PMID:
29563494
PMCID:
PMC5862964
DOI:
10.1038/s41467-018-03205-z
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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