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Gynecol Oncol. 2018 Jun;149(3):545-553. doi: 10.1016/j.ygyno.2018.03.048. Epub 2018 Mar 17.

Identifying modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors associated with prolonged length of stay after hysterectomy for uterine cancer.

Author information

1
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, USA.
2
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, USA; Department of Epidemiology, Joseph L. Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, USA; Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, USA; New York Presbyterian Hospital, USA.
3
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, USA; Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, USA; New York Presbyterian Hospital, USA.
4
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, USA; Department of Epidemiology, Joseph L. Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, USA.
5
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, USA; Department of Medicine, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, USA; Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, USA; New York Presbyterian Hospital, USA.
6
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, USA; Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, USA; New York Presbyterian Hospital, USA. Electronic address: jw2459@cumc.columbia.edu.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

We examined the influence of modifiable (intraoperative factors and complications) and non-modifiable (clinical and demographic characteristics) factors on length of stay (LOS) for women who underwent hysterectomy for uterine cancer.

METHODS:

The National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database was used to identify women who underwent hysterectomy for uterine cancer from 2006 to 2015. The association between demographic, preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative factors and LOS was examined. The primary outcome was prolonged LOS (>75th an3 >90th percentiles). Model fit statistics were used to assess the importance of each group of characteristics.

RESULTS:

Of 19,084 women identified, 6082 (31.9%) underwent abdominal and 13,002 (68.1%) underwent minimally invasive hysterectomy. In the abdominal hysterectomy group, the 75th and 90th percentiles for LOS were 5 and 8days, respectively. All risk factors combined accounted for 23.6% of the variation in LOS >75th percentile. Demographic characteristics explained 4.0%, preoperative factors 7.0%, intraoperative factors 7.9%, and postoperative characteristics 9.7% of variation in prolonged LOS. In the minimally invasive group, the 75th and 90th percentiles for LOS were 1 and 2days, respectively. The combined risk factors explained 16.2% of the variation in prolonged LOS. Demographic characteristics accounted for 6.2%, preoperative factors 4.1%, intraoperative factors 6.9%, and postoperative characteristics 1.3% of variation in prolonged LOS. Similar patterns were seen when prolonged LOS was defined as >90th percentile.

CONCLUSION:

Perioperative risk factors account for approximately one quarter of the variation in prolonged LOS. Overall, a substantial proportion of the variation in LOS remains unexplained by measurable patient and hospital factors which may limit the utility of LOS as a quality metric for endometrial cancer.

PMID:
29559171
DOI:
10.1016/j.ygyno.2018.03.048
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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