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BMC Med Educ. 2018 Mar 20;18(1):43. doi: 10.1186/s12909-018-1141-2.

Clinical communication skills and professionalism education are required from the beginning of medical training - a point of view of family physicians.

Author information

1
School of Medicine (discipline of Family Medicine), Pontifical University of Paraná, Curitiba, Brazil. camilaament@gmail.com.
2
Department of Medical Education and Simulation, Faculty of Medicine, University of Porto, Alameda Prof. Hernâni Monteiro, 4200-319, Porto, Portugal. camilaament@gmail.com.
3
Department of Medical Education and Simulation, Faculty of Medicine, University of Porto, Alameda Prof. Hernâni Monteiro, 4200-319, Porto, Portugal.
4
School of Medicine (discipline of Introduction to the Medical Practice), Pontifical University of Paraná, Curitiba, Brazil.
5
Department of Public Health, Federal University of Health Sciences of Porto Alegre (UFCSPA), Porto Alegre, Brazil.
6
Community Health Service of the Conceição Hospital Group, R. Sarmento Leite, 245 - Centro Histórico, Porto Alegre, RS, 90050-170, Brazil.
7
Department of Epidemiology, Predictive Medicine and Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of Porto, Porto, Portugal.
8
Institute of Public Health, University of Porto, Portugal. Alameda Prof. Hernâni Monteiro, 4200-319, Porto, Portugal.
9
Faculty of Medicine, University of Porto, Porto, Portugal.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The Brazilian undergraduate medical course is six years long. As in other countries, a medical residency is not obligatory to practice as a doctor. In this context, this paper aims to clarify what and when competencies in communication and professionalism should be addressed, shedding light on the role of university, residency and post-residency programmes.

METHODS:

Brazilian family physicians with diverse levels of medical training answered a questionnaire designed to seek a consensus on the competencies that should be taught (key competencies) and when students should achieve them during their medical training. The data were analysed using descriptive statistics and correlation tests.

RESULTS:

A total of seventy-four physicians participated; nearly all participants suggested that the students should achieve communication and professionalism competencies during undergraduate study (twenty out of thirty competencies - 66.7%) or during residency (seven out of thirty competencies - 23.33%). When competencies were analysed in domains, the results were that clinical communication skills and professionalism competencies should be achieved during undergraduate medical education, and interpersonal communication and leadership skills should be reached during postgraduate study.

CONCLUSION:

The authors propose that attainment of clinical communication skills and professionalism competencies should be required for undergraduate students. The foundation for Leadership and Interpersonal Abilities should be particularly formed at an undergraduate level and, furthermore, mastered by immersion in the future workplace and medical responsibilities in residency.

KEYWORDS:

Communication; Family physician; Medical education; Primary care; Professionalism

PMID:
29558914
PMCID:
PMC5859538
DOI:
10.1186/s12909-018-1141-2
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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