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Br J Psychiatry. 2018 Apr;212(4):195-196. doi: 10.1192/bjp.2018.1.

Cannabis and psychosis: what do we know and what should we do?

Author information

1
National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Biomedical Research Centre (BRC),South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust,UK;Department of Psychosis Studies,Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience,King's College London,UK.
2
National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Biomedical Research Centre (BRC),South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust;Department of Psychosis Studies,Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience,King's College London,UK;Department of Psychiatry,Experimental Biomedicine and Clinical Neuroscience (BIONEC),University of Palermo,Italy.

Abstract

It is now incontrovertible that heavy use of cannabis increases the risk of psychosis. There is a dose-response relationship and high potency preparations and synthetic cannabinoids carry the greatest risk. It would be wise to await the outcome of the different models of legalisation that are being introduced in North America, before deciding whether or not to follow suit. Declaration of interest None.

PMID:
29557759
DOI:
10.1192/bjp.2018.1
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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