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Curr Environ Health Rep. 2018 Mar;5(1):1-19. doi: 10.1007/s40572-018-0173-4.

Developmental Exposures to Perfluoroalkyl Substances (PFASs): An Update of Associated Health Outcomes.

Author information

1
Department of Epidemiology, Fielding School of Public Health, University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), 650 Charles E. Young Dr. South, Los Angeles, CA, 90095, USA.
2
First Department of Medicine, Hokkaido University School of Medicine, Sapporo, Japan. ghouman@cehs.hokudai.ac.jp.
3
Center for Environmental and Health Sciences, Hokkaido University, North 12 West 7 Kita-ku, Sapporo, 060-0812, Japan. ghouman@cehs.hokudai.ac.jp.
4
Department of Environmental Health, Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health, Landmark Center, 401, Park Drive, Boston, MA, 02215, USA.

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW:

We reviewed and summarized the epidemiological evidence for the influence that pre- and postnatal exposures to perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) may have on health outcomes in offspring, with a particular focus on birth outcomes and postnatal growth, immunomodulatory effects and neurodevelopment.

RECENT FINDINGS:

PFASs are persistent organic pollutants that have been widely produced and used in a range of commercial products since the 1950s. Human exposures to PFASs are nearly ubiquitous globally, but studies that addressed potential health effects of PFASs have only begun to accumulate in recent years. Animal studies suggest adverse effects resulting from developmental encompasses prenatal exposures to PFASs. In humans, the developing fetus is exposed to PFASs via active or passive placenta transfer, while newborns might be exposed via breastfeeding or PFAS in the home environment. Overall, epidemiological findings are consistent and suggest possible associations with fetal and postnatal growth and immune function, while the findings on neurodevelopmental endpoints to date are rather inconclusive. Methodological challenges and future directions for PFASs-focused research are discussed.

KEYWORDS:

Developmental exposures; Fetal growth; Immunotoxicity; Neurodevelopment; Perfluoroalkyl substances

PMID:
29556975
PMCID:
PMC6348874
DOI:
10.1007/s40572-018-0173-4
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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