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Environ Int. 2018 May;114:360-364. doi: 10.1016/j.envint.2018.03.003. Epub 2018 Mar 17.

Can the pharmaceutically active compounds released in agroecosystems be considered as emerging plant stressors?

Author information

1
Agricultural Research Institute, Ministry of Agriculture, Rural Development and Environment, P.O. Box 22016, 1516 Nicosia, Cyprus. Electronic address: anastasis.christou@ari.gov.cy.
2
NIREAS-International Water Research Center, University of Cyprus, P.O. Box 20537, 1678 Nicosia, Cyprus.
3
NIREAS-International Water Research Center, University of Cyprus, P.O. Box 20537, 1678 Nicosia, Cyprus; Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Cyprus, P.O. Box 20537, 1678 Nicosia, Cyprus.
4
Department of Agricultural Sciences, Biotechnology and Food Science, Cyprus University of Technology, 3603 Lemesos, Cyprus. Electronic address: vassilis.fotopoulos@cut.ac.cy.

Abstract

Pharmaceutically active compounds (PhACs) entering agroecosystems as a result of various human activities may be taken up by and accumulated within crop plants, with potential human health implications. Despite their extensive metabolism by a sophisticated enzyme-based detoxification system in plant cells, PhACs and their transformation products (TPs) may result in adverse effects on plants' physiology. PhACs-mediated phytotoxic effects, as well as plants' defense responses have been depicted on plants exposed to individual or low number of PhACs under controlled conditions. We highlight the need to consider the cocktails effects and synergistic interactions of PhACs present in mixtures in actual agroecosystems, towards phytotoxicity and agricultural sustainability in general. Considering PhACs as emerging plant stressors will better facilitate the understanding of their phytotoxic effects.

KEYWORDS:

Antibiotics; Cocktail effects; Oxidative stress; Phytotoxicity; Plant physiology; Reclaimed wastewater irrigation

PMID:
29555371
DOI:
10.1016/j.envint.2018.03.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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