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J Neuroinflammation. 2018 Mar 19;15(1):88. doi: 10.1186/s12974-018-1108-6.

MOG-IgG in primary and secondary chronic progressive multiple sclerosis: a multicenter study of 200 patients and review of the literature.

Author information

1
Molecular Neuroimmunology Group, Department of Neurology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. sven.jarius@med.uni-heidelberg.de.
2
Otto Meyerhof Center, Im Neuenheimer Feld 350, 69120, Heidelberg, Germany. sven.jarius@med.uni-heidelberg.de.
3
Department of Neurology, Charité - University Medicine Berlin, Berlin, Germany.
4
Institut für Neuroimmunologie und Multiple Sklerose (INIMS), Zentrum für Molekulare Neurobiologie Hamburg, Universitätsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany.
5
Klinik und Poliklinik für Neurologie, Universitätsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany.
6
Department of Neurology, University of Ulm, Ulm, Germany.
7
Department of Neurology, Ruhr University Bochum, Bochum, Germany.
8
Department of Neurology, Hannover Medical School, Hanover, Germany.
9
Department of Neurology, Otto von Guericke University Magdeburg, Magdeburg, Germany.
10
Department of Neurology and Institute of Laboratory Medicine, University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel, Germany.
11
Molecular Neuroimmunology Group, Department of Neurology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany.
12
Marianne-Strauß-Klinik, Behandlungszentrum Kempfenhausen für Multiple Sklerose Kranke, Berg, Germany.
13
Specialty Clinic of Neurology Dietenbronn, Schwendi, Germany.
14
Institute of Experimental Immunology, affiliated to Euroimmun AG, Lübeck, Germany.
15
Clinical Department of Neurology, Medical University of Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Austria.
16
NeuroCure Clinical Research Center, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, corporate member of Freie Universität Berlin, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, and Berlin Institute of Health, Berlin, Germany.
17
Experimental and Clinical Research Center, Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine, Berlin, Germany.
18
Molecular Neuroimmunology Group, Department of Neurology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. brigitte.wildemann@med.uni-heidelberg.de.
19
Otto Meyerhof Center, Im Neuenheimer Feld 350, 69120, Heidelberg, Germany. brigitte.wildemann@med.uni-heidelberg.de.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Antibodies to human full-length myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG-IgG) as detected by new-generation cell-based assays have recently been described in patients presenting with acute demyelinating disease of the central nervous system, including patients previously diagnosed with multiple sclerosis (MS). However, only limited data are available on the relevance of MOG-IgG testing in patients with chronic progressive demyelinating disease. It is unclear if patients with primary progressive MS (PPMS) or secondary progressive MS (SPMS) should routinely be tested for MOG-IgG.

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate the frequency of MOG-IgG among patients classified as having PPMS or SPMS based on current diagnostic criteria.

METHODS:

For this purpose, we retrospectively tested serum samples of 200 patients with PPMS or SPMS for MOG-IgG using cell-based assays. In addition, we performed a review of the entire English language literature on MOG-IgG published between 2011 and 2017.

RESULTS:

None of 139 PPMS and 61 SPMS patients tested was positive for MOG-IgG. Based on a review of the literature, we identified 35 further MOG-IgG tests in patients with PPMS and 55 in patients with SPMS; the only reportedly positive sample was positive just at threshold level and was tested in a non-IgG-specific assay. In total, a single borderline positive result was observed among 290 tests.

CONCLUSION:

Our data suggest that MOG-IgG is absent or extremely rare among patients with PPMS or SPMS. Routine screening of patients with typical PPMS/SPMS for MOG-IgG seems not to be justified.

KEYWORDS:

Antibodies; Immunoglobulin G; MOG-IgG; Myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG); Neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders (NMOSD); Primary chronic progressive MS (PPMS); Secondary chronic progressive MS (SPMS)

PMID:
29554927
PMCID:
PMC5859439
DOI:
10.1186/s12974-018-1108-6
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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