Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Vis Exp. 2018 Feb 28;(132). doi: 10.3791/57281.

Isolating Lymphocytes from the Mouse Small Intestinal Immune System.

Author information

1
Center for Infectious Diseases, Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, Stony Brook University.
2
Center for Infectious Diseases, Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, Stony Brook University; brian.sheridan@stonybrook.edu.

Abstract

The intestinal immune system plays an essential role in maintaining the barrier function of the gastrointestinal tract by generating tolerant responses to dietary antigens and commensal bacteria while mounting effective immune responses to enteropathogenic microbes. In addition, it has become clear that local intestinal immunity has a profound impact on distant and systemic immunity. Therefore, it is important to study how an intestinal immune response is induced and what the immunologic outcome of the response is. Here, a detailed protocol is described for the isolation of lymphocytes from small intestine inductive sites like the gut-associated lymphoid tissue Peyer's patches and the draining mesenteric lymph nodes and effector sites like the lamina propria and the intestinal epithelium. This technique ensures isolation of a large numbers of lymphocytes from small intestinal tissues with optimal purity and viability and minimal cross compartmental contamination within acceptable time constraints. The technical capability to isolate lymphocytes and other immune cells from intestinal tissues enables the understanding of immune responses to gastrointestinal infections, cancers, and inflammatory diseases.

PMID:
29553537
PMCID:
PMC5931411
DOI:
10.3791/57281
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for MyJove Corporation Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center