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Adv Health Sci Educ Theory Pract. 2018 Mar 17. doi: 10.1007/s10459-018-9821-6. [Epub ahead of print]

A framework for mentoring of medical students: thematic analysis of mentoring programmes between 2000 and 2015.

Author information

1
Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore, Singapore.
2
Singapore General Hospital, Singapore, Singapore.
3
Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine, Singapore, Singapore.
4
Family Medicine Residency, National University Hospital Singapore, Singapore, Singapore. yingpintoh@gmail.com.
5
Division of Supportive and Palliative Care, National Cancer Centre Singapore, 11 Hospital Drive, Singapore, 169610, Singapore. yingpintoh@gmail.com.
6
Division of Supportive and Palliative Care, National Cancer Centre Singapore, 11 Hospital Drive, Singapore, 169610, Singapore.
7
Duke- NUS Graduate Medical School, Singapore, Singapore.
8
Centre for Biomedical Ethics, National University of Singapore, Singapore, Singapore.

Abstract

A consistent mentoring approach is key to unlocking the full benefits of mentoring, ensuring effective oversight of mentoring relationships and preventing abuse of mentoring. Yet consistency in mentoring between senior clinicians and medical students (novice mentoring) which dominate mentoring processes in medical schools is difficult to achieve particularly when mentors practice in both undergraduate and postgraduate medical schools. To facilitate a consistent approach to mentoring this review scrutinizes common aspects of mentoring in undergraduate and postgraduate medical schools to forward a framework for novice mentoring in medical schools. Four authors preformed independent literature searches of novice mentoring guidelines and programmes in undergraduate and postgraduate medical schools using ERIC, PubMed, CINAHL, OVID and Science Direct databases. 25,605 abstracts were retrieved, 162 full-text articles were reviewed and 34 articles were included. The 4 themes were identified-preparation, initiating and supporting the mentoring process and the obstacles to effective mentoring. These themes highlight 2 key elements of an effective mentoring framework-flexibility and structure. Flexibility refers to meeting the individual and changing needs of mentees. Structure concerns ensuring consistency to the mentoring process and compliance with prevailing codes of conduct and standards of practice.

KEYWORDS:

Medical education; Medical student; Mentoring; Novice; Professional development

PMID:
29550907
DOI:
10.1007/s10459-018-9821-6

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