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Physiol Behav. 2018 May 15;189:99-106. doi: 10.1016/j.physbeh.2018.03.014. Epub 2018 Mar 13.

A one-year resistance training program following weight loss has no significant impact on body composition and energy expenditure in postmenopausal women living with overweight and obesity.

Author information

1
School of Human Kinetics, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Canada.
2
Institut de recherches cliniques de Montréal (IRCM), Montreal, Canada.
3
Faculty of physical activity sciences, University of Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Canada; Research Center on Aging, Health and Social Services Centre, University institute of geriatrics of Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Canada.
4
Department of Kinesiology, Université de Montréal, Montreal, Canada.
5
School of Human Kinetics, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Canada; Institut du Savoir Montfort, Ottawa, Canada.
6
Institut de recherches cliniques de Montréal (IRCM), Montreal, Canada; Department of Nutrition, Université de Montréal, Montreal, Canada; Research Center of the Centre Hospitalier de l'Université de Montréal (CRCHUM), Montreal, Canada; Montreal Diabetes Research Center, Montréal, Canada.
7
School of Human Kinetics, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Canada. Electronic address: edoucet@uottawa.ca.

Abstract

Resistance training (RT) has been shown to decrease fat mass (FM), and increase fat-free mass (FFM), which can be a useful for weight loss maintenance.

OBJECTIVE:

To examine the effects of a 1-year RT intervention on weight loss maintenance following a 6-month dietary weight loss intervention.

DESIGN:

Following a 6-month dietary weight loss intervention (-6% ± 5.8; 5.05 kg ± 4.45), 70 postmenopausal women living with overweight or obesity were randomized to a control group (n = 34) or a RT group (n = 36) (3×/week first 6 months, 2×/week last 6 months, 70-80% of 1-repetition maximum). Body composition (DXA), abdominal visceral adipose tissue (VAT) and subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) (CT scan), resting energy expenditure (EE) (indirect calorimetry), physical activity EE and total daily EE were measured (doubly-labelled water).

RESULTS:

A total of 54 participants completed the study (control group n = 29; RT group n = 25) and compliance to the RT program was on average 64%. Significant regains were noted for body weight 0.98 (3.71) kg vs. 1.33 (3.94) kg and FM regain 1.32 (2.69) kg vs. 0.81 (3.26) kg in control and RT groups after the 1-year weight maintenance phase. No group differences were noted. Resting EE and total daily EE did not change after the weight maintenance phase, and no differences were observed between groups. Both groups had significantly greater than predicted decrease in resting EE after the 6-month dietary intervention and at the end of the 1-year weight-loss maintenance phase.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our results suggest that a 1-year RT intervention following a 6-month dietary weight loss intervention does not improve weight loss maintenance, body composition or EE in post-menopausal women living with overweight or obesity.

KEYWORDS:

Obesity; Postmenopausal women; Resistance training; Weight loss maintenance

PMID:
29549030
DOI:
10.1016/j.physbeh.2018.03.014
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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