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Ann Epidemiol. 2018 Sep;28(9):583-589.e3. doi: 10.1016/j.annepidem.2018.02.007. Epub 2018 Feb 15.

The association of cardiorespiratory fitness with cardiometabolic factors, markers of inflammation, and endothelial dysfunction in Latino youth: findings from the Hispanic Community Children's Health Study/Study of Latino Youth.

Author information

1
Department of Epidemiology & Population Health, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY. Electronic address: carmen.isasi@einstein.yu.edu.
2
Department of Epidemiology & Population Health, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY.
3
Institute for Minority Health Research, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago.
4
Collaborative Studies Coordinating Center, Department of Biostatistics, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill.
5
Department of Psychology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL.
6
Department of Psychology, University of Miami, Miami, FL.
7
Institute for Behavioral and Community Health, Graduate School of Public Health, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA.
8
Department of Preventive Medicine, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To evaluate the relationship of cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) with cardiovascular disease risk factors and a biomarker of endothelial dysfunction (e-selectin) among Hispanic/Latino youth.

METHODS:

The study included 1380 Hispanic/Latino youths (8-16 years old) from the Hispanic Community Children's Health Study/Study of Latino Youth that enrolled from four cities (Bronx, Chicago, Miami, and San Diego). CRF was assessed by a 3-minute step test that uses postexercise heart rate to estimate maximal oxygen uptake. Regression models assessed differences in cardiometabolic markers across quartiles of CRF, adjusting for potential confounders.

RESULTS:

CRF was higher among boys (mean: 57.6 mL per kg/min, 95% confidence interval, 56.8-58.4) compared to girls (mean: 54.7 mL per kg/min, 95% confidence interval, 53.9-55.5). Higher levels of CRF were associated with more favorable levels of cardiometabolic, inflammation, and endothelial dysfunction factors (P-values <.001) and independently of physical activity and sedentary time. Compared to the lowest quartile of CRF, the odds of having greater than or equal to two cardiovascular disease risk factors was lower at higher quartiles of CRF, after adjustment for potential confounders.

CONCLUSIONS:

Among Hispanic/Latino youth, CRF appears to be a strong protective factor for endothelial dysfunction and cardiometabolic risk factors. Strategies to improve CRF may be a useful approach for improving cardiovascular health in youth.

KEYWORDS:

Cardiometabolic risk; Cardiorrespiratory fitness; Children; Endothelial function; Hispanic

PMID:
29548689
PMCID:
PMC6093801
DOI:
10.1016/j.annepidem.2018.02.007
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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