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J Ethnopharmacol. 2018 Jun 12;219:23-30. doi: 10.1016/j.jep.2018.03.013. Epub 2018 Mar 12.

Cananga odorata essential oil reverses the anxiety induced by 1-(3-chlorophenyl) piperazine through regulating the MAPK pathway and serotonin system in mice.

Author information

1
School of Agriculture and Biology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 800 Dong Chuan Road, Shanghai, China. Electronic address: fxzwzhangnan@sjtu.edu.cn.
2
CAS Key Laboratory of Receptor Research, Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 555 Zu Chong Zhi Road, Shanghai, China. Electronic address: zhangleisimm@simm.ac.cn.
3
CAS Key Laboratory of Receptor Research, Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 555 Zu Chong Zhi Road, Shanghai, China. Electronic address: lyfeng@simm.ac.cn.
4
School of Agriculture and Biology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 800 Dong Chuan Road, Shanghai, China. Electronic address: yaolei@sjtu.edu.cn.

Abstract

ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE:

Cananga odorata essential oil, known as ylang-ylang essential oil (YYO), was commonly used in the aromatherapy for relaxation and mood adjusting use. In our previous study, YYO played anxiolytic effects on the mice in several behavioral tests that based on the instinctive responses to novel environments.

AIM OF THE STUDY:

To investigate the effects and mechanisms of YYO reversing the anxiety induced by 5-HT2C receptor agonist 1-(3-chlorophenyl) piperazine (m-CPP).

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

m-CPP was administrated to the male ICR mice to develop an anxiety model. The anxiolytic effect of YYO (0.1%, 1% and 10%, v/v) was evaluated in the elevated plus maze (EPM) test after odor exposure. Western blot was used to detect the phosphorylation levels of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) and the expression of c-Fos in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and hippocampus after the EPM test. Serotonin and its metabolite change in the brain were detected by liquid chromatogram with an electrochemical detector. The effect of YYO on the plasma corticosterone level was evaluated using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) after the odor exposure.

RESULTS:

The behavior analysis showed that m-CPP (2 mg/kg and 4 mg/kg) could induce anxiety behaviors in the mice while diazepam (2 mg/kg) reversed the anxiety behavior induced by m-CPP. YYO dose-dependently increased the time and number of entries in the open arms (p < 0.05) compared to the Tween 80 group. YYO reduced the phosphorylation levels of ERK1/2 (p < 0.05) in both PFC and hippocampus. Down-regulations of phosphor-CREB (p < 0.05) and c-Fos (p < 0.05) were only observed in the hippocampus. YYO also affected the brain serotonin metabolism and reduced the blood plasma corticosterone level of the m-CPP treated mice.

CONCLUSION:

YYO odor exposure could reverse the anxiety behaviors generated by m-CPP. The anxiolytic effect of YYO was associated with the ERK1/2/CREB pathway in the hippocampus and relevant to the serotonin system.

KEYWORDS:

1-(3-Chlorophenyl) piperazine; 1-(3-Chlorophenyl) piperazine (PubChem CID: 1355); 5-HT; Anxiolytic effect; Cananga odorata; Diazepam (PubChem CID: 3016); MAPK

PMID:
29545208
DOI:
10.1016/j.jep.2018.03.013
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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