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MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2018 Mar 16;67(10):294-299. doi: 10.15585/mmwr.mm6710a3.

Exposure to Electronic Cigarette Advertising Among Middle and High School Students - United States, 2014-2016.

Author information

1
Office on Smoking and Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, CDC.

Abstract

Electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) are the most commonly used tobacco product among U.S. middle and high school students (1). Exposure to e-cigarette advertisements is associated with higher odds of current e-cigarette use among middle and high school students (2-4). To assess patterns of self-reported exposure to four e-cigarette advertising sources (retail stores, the Internet, television, and newspapers and magazines), CDC analyzed data from the 2014, 2015, and 2016 National Youth Tobacco Surveys (NYTSs). Overall, exposure to e-cigarette advertising from at least one source increased each year during 2014-2016 (2014: 68.9%, 18.3 million; 2015: 73.0%, 19.2 million; 2016: 78.2%, 20.5 million). In 2016, exposure was highest for retail stores (68.0%), followed by the Internet (40.6%), television (37.7%), and newspapers and magazines (23.9%). During 2014-2016, youth exposure to e-cigarette advertising increased for retail stores (54.8% to 68.0%), decreased for newspapers and magazines (30.4% to 23.9%), and did not significantly change for the Internet or television. A comprehensive strategy to prevent and reduce youth use of e-cigarettes and other tobacco products includes efforts to reduce youth exposure to e-cigarette advertising from a range of sources, including retail stores, television, the Internet, and print media such as newspapers and magazines (5).

PMID:
29543786
PMCID:
PMC5857199
DOI:
10.15585/mmwr.mm6710a3
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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