Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2018 Jul;53(7):757-761. doi: 10.1007/s00127-018-1502-5. Epub 2018 Mar 14.

Baby or bathwater? Referrals of "non-cases" in a targeted early identification intervention for psychosis.

Jordan G1,2, Kinkaid M1,2, Iyer SN1,2,3, Joober R1,2,3, Goldberg K1, Malla A1,2,3, Shah JL4,5,6.

Author information

1
Prevention and Early Intervention Program for Psychoses, Douglas Mental Health University Institute, Verdun, Canada.
2
Department of Psychiatry, McGill University, 6875 Boulevard LaSalle, Verdun, QC, Canada.
3
ACCESS Open Minds, Verdun, Canada.
4
Prevention and Early Intervention Program for Psychoses, Douglas Mental Health University Institute, Verdun, Canada. jai.shah@mcgill.ca.
5
Department of Psychiatry, McGill University, 6875 Boulevard LaSalle, Verdun, QC, Canada. jai.shah@mcgill.ca.
6
ACCESS Open Minds, Verdun, Canada. jai.shah@mcgill.ca.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To explore the unintended impact of a targeted case identification (TCI) campaign for first episode psychosis (FEP) on people not experiencing FEP ("non-cases") with respect to referral patterns and reasons for being a non-case.

METHODS:

Sources of referral, reasons for being a non-case, and subsequent referral destinations of non-cases were examined before and after a TCI.

RESULTS:

Following the TCI, a greater proportion of non-cases lived outside the study catchment area. A smaller proportion was referred by the parent hospital's emergency room or had a substance-induced psychosis.

CONCLUSIONS:

TCIs for FEP may have unintended effects, with implications for early case identification and early intervention services.

KEYWORDS:

Early case identification; Early intervention services; First episode psychosis; Non-cases

PMID:
29541798
DOI:
10.1007/s00127-018-1502-5
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Springer
Loading ...
Support Center