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Eur Radiol. 2018 Aug;28(8):3306-3317. doi: 10.1007/s00330-018-5314-5. Epub 2018 Mar 13.

Glioma imaging in Europe: A survey of 220 centres and recommendations for best clinical practice.

Author information

1
Lysholm Neuroradiology Department, National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, London, UK.
2
Department of Brain Rehabilitation and Repair, UCL Institute of Neurology, London, UK.
3
Imaging Department, University College London Hospital, London, UK.
4
Department of Neuroradiology, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany.
5
Department of Neuroradiology, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy.
6
Neuroimaging Sciences, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK.
7
Institution for Clinical Sciences/Radiology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
8
Centre for Imaging and Physiology, Skåne University hospital, Lund, Sweden.
9
General Anti-Cancer and Oncological Hospital "Agios Savvas", Athens, Greece.
10
Central Clinic of Athens, Athens, Greece.
11
University of Athens, Athens, Greece.
12
Hospital 12 de Octubre, Madrid, Spain.
13
Image Diagnostic Centre, Hospital Clinic de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain.
14
Magnetic Resonance Core Facility, Institut per la Recerca Biomedica August Pi i Sunyer (IDIBAPS), Barcelona, Spain.
15
Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
16
Department of Epidemiology, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
17
Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. marion.smits@erasmusmc.nl.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

At a European Society of Neuroradiology (ESNR) Annual Meeting 2015 workshop, commonalities in practice, current controversies and technical hurdles in glioma MRI were discussed. We aimed to formulate guidance on MRI of glioma and determine its feasibility, by seeking information on glioma imaging practices from the European Neuroradiology community.

METHODS:

Invitations to a structured survey were emailed to ESNR members (n=1,662) and associates (n=6,400), European national radiologists' societies and distributed via social media.

RESULTS:

Responses were received from 220 institutions (59% academic). Conventional imaging protocols generally include T2w, T2-FLAIR, DWI, and pre- and post-contrast T1w. Perfusion MRI is used widely (85.5%), while spectroscopy seems reserved for specific indications. Reasons for omitting advanced imaging modalities include lack of facility/software, time constraints and no requests. Early postoperative MRI is routinely carried out by 74% within 24-72 h, but only 17% report a percent measure of resection. For follow-up, most sites (60%) issue qualitative reports, while 27% report an assessment according to the RANO criteria. A minority of sites use a reporting template (23%).

CONCLUSION:

Clinical best practice recommendations for glioma imaging assessment are proposed and the current role of advanced MRI modalities in routine use is addressed.

KEY POINTS:

• We recommend the EORTC-NBTS protocol as the clinical standard glioma protocol. • Perfusion MRI is recommended for diagnosis and follow-up of glioma. • Use of advanced imaging could be promoted with increased education activities. • Most response assessment is currently performed qualitatively. • Reporting templates are not widely used, and could facilitate standardisation.

KEYWORDS:

Brain neoplasms; Glioma; Guideline; Magnetic resonance imaging; Surveys and questionnaires

PMID:
29536240
PMCID:
PMC6028837
DOI:
10.1007/s00330-018-5314-5
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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