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Dev Cell. 2018 Mar 12;44(5):542-553. doi: 10.1016/j.devcel.2018.01.019.

Neutrophil Extracellular Traps: The Biology of Chromatin Externalization.

Author information

1
Department of Cellular Microbiology, Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology, Charitéplatz 1, Campus Charité Mitte, 10117 Berlin, Germany.
2
Department of Cellular Microbiology, Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology, Charitéplatz 1, Campus Charité Mitte, 10117 Berlin, Germany. Electronic address: zychlinsky@mpiib-berlin.mpg.de.

Abstract

Neutrophils are essential to the homeostatic mission of safeguarding host tissues, responding rapidly and diversely to breaches of the host's barriers to infection, and returning tissues to a sterile state. In response to specific stimuli, neutrophils extrude modified chromatin structures decorated with specific cytoplasmic and granular proteins called neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). Several pathways lead to this unique form of cell death (NETosis). Extracellular chromatin may have evolved to defend eukaryotic organisms against infection, and its release has at least three functions: trapping and killing of microbes, amplifying immune responses, and inducing coagulation. Here we review neutrophil development and heterogeneity with a focus on NETs, NET formation, and their relevance in host defense and disease.

KEYWORDS:

NET; antimicrobial activity; extracellular chromatin; innate immunity; neutrophil; neutrophil extracellular traps

PMID:
29533770
DOI:
10.1016/j.devcel.2018.01.019
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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