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Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2018 May;98(5):1339-1342. doi: 10.4269/ajtmh.17-0814. Epub 2018 Mar 8.

Natural Infection of Phlebotomus sergenti by Leishmania tropica in Libya.

Author information

1
Department of Zoology, Faculty of Science, University of Sabratha, Sabratha, Libya.
2
Libyan National Centre for Disease Control (NCDC), Tripoli, Libya.
3
Laboratory of Medical Epidemiology, Institut Pasteur de Tunis, Tunis, Tunisia.
4
Laboratory of Transmission, Control and Immunobiology of Infections (LR11IPT02), Institut Pasteur de Tunis, Tunis, Tunisia.
5
Center of Excellence for Emerging and Zoonotic Animal Disease, Kansas State University, Manhattan, Kansas.
6
Department of Family and Community Medicine, College of Medicine and Medical Sciences (CMMS), Arabian Gulf University (AGU), Manama, Bahrain.
7
Faculty of Medicine of Tunis, University Tunis El Manar, Tunis, Tunisia.
8
Public Health Department, Faculty of Medical Technology, University of Tripoli, Tripoli, Libya.

Abstract

Cutaneous Leishmaniasis (CL) is a public health concern caused by Leishmania (L.) major and L.tropica in Libya. Information on sandfly vectors, as well as their associated Leishmania species, is of paramount importance because vector dispersion is one of the major factors responsible for pathogen dissemination. A number of 515 sandflies (275 males and 240 females) were collected during June-November 2012 using the Centers for Disease Control miniature light traps from Al Rabta, northwest of Libya. Two hundred and forty unfed females were identified; Phlebotomus (Ph.) papatasi (N = 97), Ph. sergenti (N = 27), Ph. longicuspis (N = 32), Sergentomyia (Se.) minuta (N = 38), and Se. fallax (N = 46). These flies were screened for Leishmania DNA using the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of the internal transcribed spacer 1 and sequencing. Two Ph. sergenti were found positive to L. tropica DNA. This finding should be considered for any further vector surveillance and epidemiological studies of CL in endemic areas across Libya.

PMID:
29532769
PMCID:
PMC5953382
[Available on 2019-05-01]
DOI:
10.4269/ajtmh.17-0814

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