Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Curr Diab Rep. 2018 Mar 12;18(4):20. doi: 10.1007/s11892-018-0984-6.

Role of the Immune System in Diabetic Kidney Disease.

Author information

1
Department of Clinical Medicine, Trinity College Dublin, Tallaght Hospital, Dublin, Dublin 24, Ireland.
2
School of Biomolecular & Biomedical Science, UCD Conway Institute, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland. finian.martin@ucd.ie.

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW:

The purpose of this review is to examine the proposed role of immune modulation in the development and progression of diabetic kidney disease (DKD).

RECENT FINDINGS:

Diabetic kidney disease has not historically been considered an immune-mediated disease; however, increasing evidence is emerging in support of an immune role in its pathophysiology. Both systemic and local renal inflammation have been associated with DKD. Infiltration of immune cells, predominantly macrophages, into the kidney has been reported in a number of both experimental and clinical studies. In addition, increased levels of circulating pro-inflammatory cytokines have been linked to disease progression. Consequently, a variety of therapeutic strategies involving modulation of the immune response are currently being investigated in diabetic kidney disease. Although no current therapies for DKD are directly based on immune modulation many of the therapies in clinical use have anti-inflammatory effects along with their primary actions. Macrophages emerge as the most likely beneficial immune cell target and compounds which reduce macrophage infiltration to the kidney have shown potential in both animal models and clinical trials.

KEYWORDS:

Cytokines; Diabetic kidney disease; Inflammation; Leukocytes; Macrophages

PMID:
29532281
DOI:
10.1007/s11892-018-0984-6
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Springer
Loading ...
Support Center