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Appl Physiol Nutr Metab. 2018 Aug;43(8):857-860. doi: 10.1139/apnm-2017-0619. Epub 2018 Mar 12.

Physical characteristics cannot be used to predict cooling time using cold-water immersion as a treatment for exertional hyperthermia.

Author information

1
a Human and Environmental Physiological Research Unit, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON K1N 6N5, Canada.
2
b FAME Laboratory, Department of Exercise Science, University of Thessaly, Trikala, 42100, Greece.
3
c Human and Environmental Physiological Research Unit, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON K1N 6N5, Canada.
4
d Human and Environmental Physiological Research Unit, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON K1N 6N5, Canada.
5
e Clinical Epidemiology Program, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, Ottawa, ON K1Y 4E9, Canada.

Abstract

We examined if physical characteristics could be used to predict cooling time during cold water immersion (CWI, 2 °C) following exertional hyperthermia (rectal temperature ≥39.5 °C) in a physically heterogeneous group of men and women (n = 62). Lean body mass was the only significant predictor of cooling time following CWI (R2 = 0.137; P < 0.001); however, that prediction did not provide the precision (mean residual square error: 3.18 ± 2.28 min) required to act as a safe alternative to rectal temperature measurements.

KEYWORDS:

caractéristiques physiques; cold water immersion; core temperature; coup de chaleur à l’effort; exertional heat stroke; heat stress; hyperthermia; hyperthermie; immersion en eau froide; physical characteristics; stress thermique; température centrale

PMID:
29529383
DOI:
10.1139/apnm-2017-0619
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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