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Appetite. 2018 Jun 1;125:557-565. doi: 10.1016/j.appet.2018.03.007. Epub 2018 Mar 9.

Beverages containing low energy sweeteners do not differ from water in their effects on appetite, energy intake and food choices in healthy, non-obese French adults.

Author information

1
CreaBio-Rhône-Alpes Research Centre, Centre Hospitalier Régional de Montgelas, 9 Avenue Professeur Fleming, F-69700 Givors, France. Electronic address: marc.fantino@creabio-ra.com.
2
CreaBio-Rhône-Alpes Research Centre, Centre Hospitalier Régional de Montgelas, 9 Avenue Professeur Fleming, F-69700 Givors, France.
3
RCTS Ltd, 38 rue du Plat, F-69002 Lyon, France.

Abstract

The usefulness of replacement of caloric sugars by low-calorie sweeteners (LCS) for weight management has been questioned on the grounds that the uncoupling of LCS sweet taste and dietary energy may confuse physiological mechanisms, leading potentially to higher energy and sugar intake. The aim of the present study was to determine whether LCS beverages compared to water, when consumed with meals, differ in their effects on energy and food intake in acute trials and after long-term habituation. Ad libitum food intake of 166 (80 women; 86 men) healthy non-obese adults (BMI between 19 and 28 kg/m2), infrequent consumers of LCS was measured in four 2-consecutive-day testing sessions (Day 1 in the laboratory, Day 2 free-living). During the first 3 sessions, held one-week apart, participants were required to drink either water or commercial non-carbonated LCS lemonade (330 ml) with their main meals (randomised cross-over design). On Day 1, motivational ratings were obtained using visual analogue scales and ad libitum food intakes (amounts and types of foods selected) were measured using the plate waste method. On Day 2, participants reported their ad libitum intakes using a food diary. After Session 3, participants were randomly assigned to the LCS habituation group or to the water control group. The habituation (660 ml LCS lemonade daily vs 660 ml water) lasted 5 weeks. The fourth and final test session measured food intakes and motivational ratings after habituation. Water and LCS beverage did not differ in their effects on total energy intake, macronutrient intakes or the selection of sweet foods and on motivational ratings. Similar results were obtained in both LCS-naïve and LCS-habituated individuals.

KEYWORDS:

Energy intake; Human subjects; Low calories sweeteners (LCS); Not habitual LCS users; Sugar intake; Sweet/savory food choices

PMID:
29526693
DOI:
10.1016/j.appet.2018.03.007
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