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Complement Ther Clin Pract. 2018 May;31:369-373. doi: 10.1016/j.ctcp.2018.01.003. Epub 2018 Feb 15.

Yoga improves quality of life and fall risk-factors in a sample of people with chronic pain and Type 2 Diabetes.

Author information

1
Colorado State University, Department of Occupational Therapy, Fort Collins, CO 80523, United States. Electronic address: arlene.schmid@colostate.edu.
2
Colorado State University, Department of Occupational Therapy, United States.
3
UCHealth, Fort Collins Family Medicine Center Residency Program, United States.
4
Colorado State University, School of Social Work, University of Colorado School of Medicine, United States.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Assess pre to-post outcomes for people with chronic pain and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) randomized to an 8-week yoga intervention or usual care.

METHODS:

Participants were included if they self-reported: chronic pain; T2DM; >18 years old; no exercise restrictions or consistent yoga; and consented to the study.

RESULTS:

After yoga, there were significant improvements in: Brief Pain Inventory pain interference (49 ± 15.00 vs. 41.25 ± 19.46, p = .034); Fullerton Advanced Balance scale (14.2 ± 14.1 vs. 20.4 ± 13.5, p = .03); upper extremity strength (7.7 ± 6.3 vs.10.8 ± 6.5, p = .02); lower extremity strength (4.1 ± 3.8 vs. 6.7 ± 4.8, p = .02); and RAND 36-item Health Survey quality of life scores (81.1 ± 7.7 vs. 91.9 ± 8.9, p = .04). Balance scores became significantly worse during the 8 weeks for people randomized to the control (27.1 ± 9.9 vs. 21.7 ± 13.4, = p.01).

CONCLUSION:

Data from this small RCT indicates yoga may be therapeutic and may improve multiple outcomes in this seemingly at-risk population.

CLINICAL TRIALS NUMBER:

NCT03010878.

KEYWORDS:

Balance; Diabetes; Falls; Pain; Quality of life; Yoga

PMID:
29526474
DOI:
10.1016/j.ctcp.2018.01.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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