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J Nutr Biochem. 2018 May;55:178-184. doi: 10.1016/j.jnutbio.2018.01.004. Epub 2018 Jan 31.

Differential effect of dietary vitamin D supplementation on natural killer cell activity in lean and obese mice.

Author information

1
Department of Food and Nutrition, College of Human Ecology, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea. Electronic address: lgykiki90@snu.ac.kr.
2
Department of Food and Nutrition, College of Human Ecology, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea. Electronic address: violin925@snu.ac.kr.
3
Department of Food and Nutrition, College of Human Ecology, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea. Electronic address: sun2rg@snu.ac.kr.
4
Department of Food and Nutrition, College of Human Ecology, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea. Electronic address: ehfehfldi@snu.ac.kr.
5
Department of Food and Nutrition, College of Human Ecology, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju, Korea. Electronic address: mpae@chungbuk.ac.kr.
6
Department of Food and Nutrition, College of Human Ecology, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea; Research Institute of Human Ecology, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea. Electronic address: snhan@snu.ac.kr.

Abstract

Vitamin D has an immunoregulatory effect on both innate and adaptive immunity. Contradictory results regarding vitamin D and natural killer (NK) cell functions have been reported with in vitro studies, but little is known about this in vivo. We investigated whether vitamin D levels (50, 1000 or 10,000 IU/kg of diet: DD, DC or DS) affect NK cell functions in mice fed a control or high-fat diet (10% or 45% kcal fat: CD or HFD) for 12 weeks. The splenic NK cell activity was significantly higher in the CD-DS group than the HFD-DS group, and the CD-DS group showed significantly higher NK cell activity compared with the CD-DD and CD-DC groups. However, no difference in NK cell activity was observed among the HFD groups fed different levels of vitamin D. The splenic population of NK cells was significantly higher in the CD-DS group than the HFD-DS group. There was no difference in the intracellular expression of IFN-γ and the surface expression of NKG2D and CD107a in NK cells by both dietary fat and vitamin D content. The splenic mRNA expression of Ifng and Ccl5 was significantly lower in the HFD groups compared with the CD groups, but there was no difference in the mRNA levels of Vdup1 and Vdr among the groups. Taken together, these results suggest that dietary vitamin D supplementation can modulate innate immunity by increasing NK activity in control mice but not in obese mice. This effect might be mediated through alternation of the splenic NK cell population.

KEYWORDS:

CD107a; IFN-γ; NK cell; Obesity; Vitamin D

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