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PLoS One. 2018 Mar 9;13(3):e0194234. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0194234. eCollection 2018.

Treatment outcomes and HPV characteristics for an institutional cohort of patients with anal cancer receiving concurrent chemotherapy and intensity-modulated radiation therapy.

Author information

1
Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, The University of Chicago Medicine, Chicago, Illinois, United States of America.
2
Department of Pathology, University of Utah/ARUP Laboratories, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States of America.
3
Department of Pathology, The University of Chicago Medicine, Chicago, Illinois, United States of America.
4
Department of Colon and Rectal Surgery, The University of Chicago Medicine, Chicago, Illinois, United States of America.
5
Section of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Medicine, The University of Chicago Medicine, Chicago, Illinois, United States of America.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has been used to limit treatment-related toxicity for patients with anal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). The treatment outcomes and HPV characteristics for a cohort of patients receiving definitive concurrent chemotherapy and IMRT are reported.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

52 patients with anal SCC were treated with IMRT and concurrent chemotherapy. Radiation was delivered sequentially to the pelvis and inguinal lymph nodes (45 Gy) and anal tumor (median dose, 54 Gy). Multiplex real-time PCR for 7 high-risk HPV subtypes (n = 22) and p16 immunohistochemistry (n = 21, rated on a 0, 1, and 2+ scale) were performed on available specimens. Survival was estimated using Kaplan-Meier analysis, and toxicities were recorded.

RESULTS:

Median follow-up was 33 months. Three-year freedom from locoregional failure (FFLRF), freedom from distant metastasis (FFDM), freedom from colostomy (FFC), and overall survival (OS) were 94%, 85%, 91%, and 90%, respectively. Acute grade 2+ skin, GI, and GU toxicities occurred in 83%, 71%, and 19% of evaluable patients, respectively. The rates of late grade 2+ GI and GU toxicities for evaluable patients (n = 32) were 28% and 9%, respectively. Of patients with available pathology, 91% and 71% were positive for HPV and p16 (2+), respectively. HPV genotypes included 16 (n = 17), 33 (n = 2), 18 (n = 1), and 45 (n = 1). HPV and p16 status were associated on Chi-square analysis (p = 0.07). Neither HPV nor p16 status was significantly associated with any clinical outcome. For HPV+ patients, 3-year FFLRF, FFDM, FFC, and OS were 100%, 69%, 100%, and 88%, respectively.

CONCLUSIONS:

In this patient cohort, disease control was excellent for anal SCC treated with definitive concurrent chemotherapy and IMRT, and treatment was well tolerated. HPV and p16 status were not prognostic for treatment outcomes which may be related to our small sample size.

PMID:
29522569
PMCID:
PMC5844568
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0194234
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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