Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Laryngoscope. 2018 Sep;128(9):2034-2048. doi: 10.1002/lary.27156. Epub 2018 Mar 9.

Teach the teacher: Training otolaryngology fellows to become academic educators.

Author information

1
Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
2
Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh of the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
3
Surgery Service, VA Pittsburgh Healthcare System, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, U.S.A.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS:

Fellowship is the capstone of academic training and serves as preparation for an academic career. Fellows are expected to educate medical students and residents during and long after fellowship. However, little time is typically spent teaching fellows to become effective educators. We investigate a formal curriculum addressing teaching skills among fellows in otolaryngology-head and neck surgery (OHNS).

STUDY DESIGN:

E-mail survey.

METHODS:

We developed and implemented an educational program called Teach the Teacher to build skills as educators for fellows in OHNS. We conducted a survey of fellows from 2014 to 2017 in OHNS who participated in the course. The survey evaluated demographics, teaching experiences, and teaching limitations structured as yes/no and Likert-style questions (1 = strongly disagree, 5 = strongly agree).

RESULTS:

Thirty fellows were surveyed with a response rate was 80%. Fellowship was rated highly as an experience that will make fellows a better academic educator (mean ± standard deviation: 4.54 ± 0.64). The most important components of teaching during fellowship were role modeling (4.67 ± 0.62), followed by teaching psychomotor skills in the operating room (4.29 ± 0.89), diagnostic reasoning (4.25 ± 0.66), and evidence-based medicine (4.25 ± 0.83). The Teach the Teacher course specifically was rated as a helpful experience (4.00 ± 0.90). The primary limitations to developing teaching skills during fellowship identified were lack of time, patient safety, and inexperience with hospital culture.

CONCLUSIONS:

Fellowship is a key time to improve skills as academic educators. Fellows value formal efforts to teach academic skills.

LEVEL OF EVIDENCE:

NA. Laryngoscope, 128:2034-2048, 2018.

KEYWORDS:

Education; fellowship; graduate medical education; head and neck surgery; otolaryngology; teaching

PMID:
29521418
DOI:
10.1002/lary.27156
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wiley
Loading ...
Support Center