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J Obstet Gynaecol Res. 2018 Jun;44(6):998-1006. doi: 10.1111/jog.13633. Epub 2018 Mar 8.

Clinical application of serum anti-Müllerian hormone as an ovarian reserve marker: A review of recent studies.

Author information

1
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya, Japan.
2
Department of Maternal and Perinatal Medicine, Nagoya University Hospital, Nagoya, Japan.

Abstract

It has been more than 15 years since the measurement of serum anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) first allowed the quantitative assessment of ovarian reserve. Meanwhile, the clinical implication of serum AMH has been expanding. The measurement of serum AMH has been applied in various clinical fields, including assisted reproduction, menopause, reproductive disorders and assessment of ovarian damage/toxicity. Well-known findings about the usefulness of serum AMH revealed by numerous studies executed in the early era include decline with aging, a good correlation with oocyte yield in assisted reproduction, upregulation in polycystic ovarian syndrome and a decrease on ovarian surgery and toxic treatment. More intensive research, including a meta-analysis, cutting-edge clinical trial and advances in AMH assays, has yielded newer findings and firmer clinical interpretations in serum AMH in the past few years. Variations in the AMH decline trajectory in the general population do not support the accurate prediction of menopause. The ability to predict pregnancy in infertility treatment and natural conception is poor, while a nomogram integrating serum AMH as a stimulation protocol is useful for avoiding poor and/or hyper-responses. On the other hand, improvements in measuring very low concentrations of serum AMH may be capable of distinguishing women with poor ovarian function. Age-independent standardization of AMH values may be helpful for comparing ovarian reserves among women at different ages.

KEYWORDS:

anti-Müllerian hormone; assisted reproduction; gynecological disease; ovarian reserve; pregnancy

PMID:
29517134
DOI:
10.1111/jog.13633
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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