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Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol. 2018 Jul 1;315(1):L59-L65. doi: 10.1152/ajplung.00030.2018. Epub 2018 Mar 8.

Greater cellular stiffness in fibroblasts from patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

Jaffar J1,2,3, Yang SH4,5, Kim SY6, Kim HW4,5, Faiz A1,7,8, Chrzanowski W4,6, Burgess JK1,7,9.

Author information

1
Woolcock Institute of Medical Research, The University of Sydney, Sydney, Austrailia.
2
Department of Allergy, Immunology and Respiratory Medicine, The Alfred Hospital , Melbourne , Australia.
3
Department of Immunology and Pathology, Monash University , Melbourne , Australia.
4
Department of Nanobiomedical Science and Global Research Center for Regenerative Medicine, Dankook University, Cheonan, Republic of Korea.
5
Institute of Tissue Regeneration Engineering and College of Dentistry, Dankook University, Cheonan, Republic of Korea.
6
Faculty of Pharmacy, The University of Sydney Nano Institute, The University of Sydney , Sydney , Australia.
7
The University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Pathology and Medical Biology, Groningen Research Institute for Asthma and COPD, Groningen, The Netherlands.
8
The University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Pulmonology, Groningen Research Institute for Asthma and COPD, Groningen, The Netherlands.
9
Discipline of Pharmacology, The University of Sydney , Sydney , Australia.

Abstract

Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a lethal lung disease involving degenerative breathing capacity. Fibrotic disease is driven by dysregulation in mechanical forces at the organ, tissue, and cellular level. While it is known that, in certain pathologies, diseased cells are stiffer than healthy cells, it is not known if fibroblasts derived from patients with IPF are stiffer than their normal counterparts. Using IPF patient-derived cell cultures, we measured the stiffness of individual lung fibroblasts via high-resolution force maps using atomic force microscopy. Fibroblasts from patients with IPF were stiffer and had an augmented cytoskeletal response to transforming growth factor-β1 compared with fibroblasts from donors without IPF. The results from this novel study indicate that the increased stiffness of lung fibroblasts of IPF patients may contribute to the increased rigidity of fibrotic lung tissue.

KEYWORDS:

atomic force microscopy; cytoskeleton; fibroblasts; idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis; α-smooth muscle actin

PMID:
29516782
DOI:
10.1152/ajplung.00030.2018

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