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Eur J Nutr. 2019 Apr;58(3):1271-1282. doi: 10.1007/s00394-018-1653-x. Epub 2018 Mar 7.

Does the MIND diet decrease depression risk? A comparison with Mediterranean diet in the SUN cohort.

Author information

1
Medical School, Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, University of Navarra, 31008, Pamplona, Spain. ujuefresan@gmail.com.
2
Center for Nutrition, Healthy Lifestyles, and Disease Prevention, Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, CA, 92350, USA. ujuefresan@gmail.com.
3
School of Public Health, Loma Linda University, 24951 Circle Dr Nichol Hall 1304, Loma Linda, CA, 92350-1718, USA. ujuefresan@gmail.com.
4
Medical School, Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, University of Navarra, 31008, Pamplona, Spain.
5
Navarra Institute for Health Research (IdisNa), 31008, Pamplona, Spain.
6
CIBER Physiopathology of Obesity and Nutrition (CIBERobn), III Institute of Health, Carlos, 28029, Madrid, Spain.
7
Center for Nutrition, Healthy Lifestyles, and Disease Prevention, Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, CA, 92350, USA.
8
Nutrition Research Group, Research Institute of Biomedical and Health Sciences, University of Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, 35001, Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Spain.
9
Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria de Navarra, Pamplona, Spain.
10
Department of Nutrition, Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health, Boston, USA.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To prospectively evaluate the association of the Mediterranean-DASH diet intervention for neurodegenerative delay (MIND) diet and the Mediterranean diet (and their components), and depression risk.

METHODS:

We followed-up (median 10.4 years) 15,980 adults initially free of depression at baseline or in the first 2 years of follow-up. Food consumption was measured at baseline through a validated food-frequency questionnaire, and was used to compute adherence to the MIND and the Mediterranean diets. Relationships between these two diets and incident depression were assessed through Cox regression models.

RESULTS:

We identified 666 cases of incident depression. Comparing the highest versus the lowest quartiles of adherence, we found no association of the MIND diet and incident depression. This relation was statistically significant for the Mediterranean diet {hazard ratio (HR) 0.75, [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.61, 0.94]; p < 0.01}, although with departure from linearity. A reduced depression risk was associated with higher consumption of both fruits and nuts [HR 0.82 (95% CI 0.69, 0.96); p = 0.02], moderate nuts consumption [HR 0.77 (95% CI 0.64, 0.93); p = 0.01], and avoidance of fast/fried food [HR 0.63 (95% CI 0.41, 0.96); p = 0.03].

CONCLUSIONS:

The Mediterranean diet was associated with reduced depression risk, but we found no evidence of such an association for the MIND diet.

KEYWORDS:

Depression risk; MIND diet; Mediterranean diet; SUN project

PMID:
29516224
DOI:
10.1007/s00394-018-1653-x
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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