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Pediatr Diabetes. 2018 Aug;19(5):1007-1013. doi: 10.1111/pedi.12668. Epub 2018 Mar 22.

A phase 3 multicenter, open-label, prospective study designed to evaluate the effectiveness and ease of use of nasal glucagon in the treatment of moderate and severe hypoglycemia in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes in the home or school setting.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics, Florida State University College of Medicine, Tallahassee, Florida.
2
Clinical Development, Locemia Solutions, Montreal, Québec, Canada.
3
Medical Development, Diabetes Business Unit, Formerly Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, Indiana.
4
Statistics, Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, Indiana.
5
Clinical Development, Pediatric Endocrine Private Practice, Baltimore, Maryland.
6
Global Scientific Communications, Diabetes Business Unit, Eli Lilly Services India Pvt. Ltd., Bangalore, Karnataka, India.
7
Medical Development, Diabetes Business Unit, Eli Lilly Canada Inc., Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

This multicenter, open-label study was designed to evaluate real-world effectiveness and ease of use of nasal glucagon (NG) in treating moderate or severe hypoglycemic events in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes (T1D).

METHODS:

Caregivers were trained to administer NG (3 mg) to the child/adolescent with T1D during spontaneous, symptomatic moderate or severe hypoglycemic events, observe treatment response (defined as awakening or returning to normal status within 30 minutes), and measure blood glucose (BG) levels every 15 minutes. Data regarding adverse events and ease of use were solicited using questionnaires.

RESULTS:

The analysis population included 14 patients who experienced 33 moderate hypoglycemic events with neuroglycopenic symptoms and BG level ≤70 mg/dL. Patients returned to normal status within 30 minutes of NG administration in all 33 events. Mean BG levels increased from 55.5 mg/dL (range 42-70 mg/dL) at baseline to 113.7 mg/dL (range 79-173 mg/dL) within 15 minutes of NG administration. In most hypoglycemic events (93.9%), caregivers reported that NG administration was easy or very easy; they could administer NG within 30 seconds in 60.6% of events. There were no serious adverse events.

CONCLUSIONS:

A single 3-mg dose of NG was effective in treating moderate, symptomatic, hypoglycemic events in children and adolescents with T1D in a real-world setting. It was easy-to-use and reasonably well tolerated. NG shows promise as an effective, needle-free, and user-friendly alternative to injectable glucagon.

KEYWORDS:

hypoglycemia; nasal glucagon; pediatrics; type 1 diabetes

PMID:
29512902
DOI:
10.1111/pedi.12668
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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