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Nat Chem Biol. 2018 May;14(5):458-465. doi: 10.1038/s41589-018-0011-x. Epub 2018 Mar 5.

Regulation of apoptosis by an intrinsically disordered region of Bcl-xL.

Author information

1
Department of Structural Biology, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, TN, USA.
2
Department of Immunology, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, TN, USA.
3
Blueprint Medicines, Cambridge, MA, USA.
4
Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute, La Jolla, CA, USA.
5
Department of Structural Biology, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, TN, USA. richard.kriwacki@stjude.org.
6
Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Biochemistry, University of Tennessee Health Sciences Center, Memphis, TN, USA. richard.kriwacki@stjude.org.

Abstract

Intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs) of proteins often regulate function upon post-translational modification (PTM) through interactions with folded domains. An IDR linking two α-helices (α1-α2) of the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-xL experiences several PTMs that reduce antiapoptotic activity. Here, we report that PTMs within the α1-α2 IDR promote its interaction with the folded core of Bcl-xL that inhibits the proapoptotic activity of two types of regulatory targets, BH3-only proteins and p53. This autoregulation utilizes an allosteric pathway whereby, in one direction, the IDR induces a direct displacement of p53 from Bcl-xL coupled to allosteric displacement of simultaneously bound BH3-only partners. This pathway operates in the opposite direction when the BH3-only protein PUMA binds to the BH3 binding groove of Bcl-xL, directly displacing other bound BH3-only proteins, and allosterically remodels the distal site, displacing p53. Our findings show how an IDR enhances functional versatility through PTM-dependent allosteric regulation of a folded protein domain.

PMID:
29507390
PMCID:
PMC5899648
DOI:
10.1038/s41589-018-0011-x
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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