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Sci Rep. 2018 Mar 5;8(1):4031. doi: 10.1038/s41598-018-22280-2.

A new electrospray method for targeted gene delivery.

Author information

1
Institute for Medical and Analytical Technologies, School of Life Sciences, University of Applied Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland, Muttenz, Switzerland.
2
Department of Pulmonary Medicine, University Hospital Bern, Bern, Switzerland.
3
Department of Biomedical Research, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland.
4
Biophysical Research Group, Faculty of Natural Sciences, Vytautas Magnus University, Kaunas, Lithuania.
5
Graduate School for Cellular and Biomedical Science, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland.
6
Department of Pulmonary Medicine, University Hospital Bern, Bern, Switzerland. amiq.gazdhar@dbmr.unibe.ch.
7
Department of Biomedical Research, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland. amiq.gazdhar@dbmr.unibe.ch.
8
Institute for Medical and Analytical Technologies, School of Life Sciences, University of Applied Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland, Muttenz, Switzerland. david.hradetzky@fhnw.ch.

Abstract

A challenge for gene therapy is absence of safe and efficient local delivery of therapeutic genetic material. An efficient and reproducible physical method of electrospray for localized and targeted gene delivery is presented. Electrospray works on the principle of coulombs repulsion, under influence of electric field the liquid carrying genetic material is dispersed into micro droplets and is accelerated towards the targeted tissue, acting as a counter electrode. The accelerated droplets penetrate the targeted cells thus facilitating the transfer of genetic material into the cell. The work described here presents the principle of electrospray for gene delivery, the basic instrument design, and the various optimized parameters to enhance gene transfer in vitro. We estimate a transfection efficiency of up to 60% was achieved. We describe an efficient gene transfer method and a potential electrospray-mediated gene transfer mechanism.

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