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Environ Health. 2018 Mar 5;17(1):24. doi: 10.1186/s12940-018-0366-1.

Early life Triclosan exposure and child adiposity at 8 Years of age: a prospective cohort study.

Author information

1
Department of Epidemiology, Brown University, Providence, RI, USA. geetika_kalloo@brown.edu.
2
Brown University School of Public Health, Box G-S121-3, Providence, RI, 02912, USA. geetika_kalloo@brown.edu.
3
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Environmental Health, Atlanta, GA, USA.
4
Department of Environmental Health, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH, USA.
5
Department of Pediatrics, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH, USA.
6
Child and Family Research Institute, BC Children's and Women's Hospital, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
7
Canada Faculty of Health Sciences, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, Canada.
8
Department of Epidemiology, Brown University, Providence, RI, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Triclosan is an antimicrobial agent that may affect the gut microbiome and endocrine system to influence adiposity. However, little data from prospective studies examining prenatal and childhood exposures exist. We investigated the relationship between multiple, prospective early life measure of triclosan exposure and child adiposity.  METHODS: In a prospective cohort of 220 mother-child pairs from Cincinnati, OH (enrolled 2003-2006), we quantified triclosan in urine samples collected twice during pregnancy, annually from 1 to 5 years of age, and once at 8 years. We assessed child adiposity at age 8 years using body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, and bioelectric impedance. We estimated covariate-adjusted associations of child adiposity with a 10-fold increase in average prenatal, average early childhood (average of 1-5 years), and 8-year triclosan concentrations.

RESULTS:

Among all children, there was no association between triclosan and child adiposity. While urinary triclosan concentrations at all three time periods were weakly, imprecisely, and inversely associated with all three measures of adiposity among girls, these associations did not differ significantly from those in boys (sex x triclosan p-values> 0.35). Among girls, the strongest associations were generally observed for prenatal triclosan when we adjusted for all three triclosan concentrations and covariates in the same model; BMI z-score (β: -0.13; 95% CI: -0.42, 0.15), waist circumference (β: - 1.7 cm; 95% CI: -4.2, 0.7), and percent body fat (β :-0.6; 95% CI: -2.7, 1.3). In contrast, the associations between triclosan concentrations and adiposity measures were inconsistent among boys.

CONCLUSION:

We did not observe evidence of an association of repeated urinary triclosan concentrations during pregnancy and childhood with measures of child adiposity at age 8 years in this cohort.

KEYWORDS:

Adiposity; Endocrine disruptors; Environmental exposures; Prenatal exposure; Triclosan

PMID:
29506550
PMCID:
PMC5838861
DOI:
10.1186/s12940-018-0366-1
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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